Search results

7 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
UNC School of Medicine Study Shows Surprise Low-level Ozone Impact on Asthma Patients
Michelle Hernandez, MD, associate medical director of the N.C. Children’s Allergy & Asthma Center, led a study that followed 23 asthma patients in North Carolina to show that even with optimized treatment for persistent asthma, patients experienced respiratory and systemic effects from exposure to low levels of ozone.
Located in News / 2018 / September
Peden named chair of FDA Allergenic Products Advisory Committee
The advisory committee advises the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at the FDA on matters, including approvals, related to allergenic products for clinical use with specific indications for allergic diseases including allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, and insect allergy.
Located in News / 2018 / July
UNC School of Medicine researchers receive $9.96 million U.S. DoD grant
The US Department of Defense tabbed UNC Marsico Lung Institute researchers led by Richard Boucher, MD, and Ilona Jaspers, PhD, to study the adverse effects of inhaling toxic fumes from burn pits in the field.
Located in News / 2018 / December
Can asthma be controlled with a vitamin supplement?
UNC School of Medicine researchers led by Michelle Hernandez, MD, found that asthma patients taking a kind of vitamin E called gamma tocopherol had less inflammation of the airways. The study points to a new way to control asthma’s chronic symptoms.
Located in News / 2017 / November
David B. Peden, MD, MS
David B. Peden, MD, MS is Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine and Microbiology/Immunology and Toxicology; Chief, Division of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases in the Department of Pediatrics and an expert in air pollution and asthma, airway inflammation, allergic diseases.
Located in For the Media / Experts Guide
UNC researchers find new potential route to treat asthma
Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have identified and isolated a protein that could play a vital role in regulating proper airway function. When that protein is low in volume or missing altogether, it can cause airway hyper-reactivity in asthma.
Located in News / 2017 / February
UNC lung researchers awarded $12.5-million NIH grant to develop new drug compounds
The National Institutes of Health has awarded four UNC experts a translational program project grant (tPPG) to develop and test therapeutics aimed at reducing the hyper-concentration of mucus often found in cystic fibrosis and asthma patients.
Located in News / 2017 / September