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How do antidepressants trigger fear and anxiety?
UNC School of Medicine researchers map the anxiety circuit in the brain and use a compound to limit fearful behavior – an acute side effect of commonly prescribed SSRI antidepressants.
Located in News / 2016 / August
UNC leads first-of-its-kind, $21-million study of posttraumatic brain disorders
The longitudinal patient-centered AURORA study – the largest study of its kind – will trace the development of posttraumatic stress, minor traumatic brain injury symptoms, chronic pain, and depression, to create new diagnostic tools and treatment interventions.
Located in News / 2016 / October
Brain scans predict effectiveness of talk therapy to treat depression
UNC researchers lead first brain connectivity study pointing toward a new image-based diagnostic model – a roadmap to ensure patients receive the best treatment as quickly as possible. Gabriel S. Dichter, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and psychology, is a senior author of the study.
Located in News / 2015 / January
Scientists use brain stimulation to boost creativity, set stage to potentially treat depression
Using a weak electric current to alter a specific brain activity pattern, UNC School of Medicine researchers increased creativity in healthy adults. Now they’re testing the same experimental protocol to alleviate symptoms in people with depression.
Located in News / 2015 / April
The Art of Clinical Science
Gabriel Dichter, PhD, earned a Hettleman Prize for his work imaging and elucidating brain regions involved in various aspects of autism, depression, and other neurological conditions.
Located in News / 2015 / October
Solving a 40-year-old mystery, UNC researchers find new route for better brain disorder treatments
New targeted therapies for pain, Parkinson's disease, and depression carry the promise of greater benefit for patients without serious side effects.
Located in News / 2014 / January
The Signal and the Noise
Henrik Dohlman, PhD, discovered why seemingly identical cells might react differently to the chemical signals inside our bodies and the drugs we use to battle diseases.
Located in News / 2014 / July