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Scientists identify gene vital for rebuilding intestine after cancer treatment
Protecting the gastrointestinal system during chemotherapy or radiation could allow patients to tolerate more aggressive treatments to attack tumors.
Located in News / 2015 / August
Biomedical engineer Zhen Gu, PhD, tabbed as top young innovator
The editors of the MIT Technology Review highlighted Gu’s work on a novel way to monitor and treat diabetes.
Located in News / 2015 / August
Scientists disguise drugs as platelets to target cancer cells
The new drug-creation method could allow cancer drugs to last longer in the body to attack tumors, as well as cancer cells floating in the blood stream.
Located in News / 2015 / October
NC researchers awarded $5.3 million to develop novel gut-on-a-chip technology
Scientists from the UNC / NC State joint biomedical engineering department are creating a new kind of research tool that will be nearly indistinguishable from the human gastrointestinal tract.
Located in News / 2015 / October
Liquid Metal ‘Nano-Terminators’ Target Cancer Cells
The new cancer drug delivery system improved efficacy of standard chemotherapy for ovarian cancer in mice with limited toxicity.
Located in News / 2015 / December
The Power of Proteins
Biomedical engineering student Scott Vu creates a new tool that prompts bacteria to make proteins for various biotech industrial uses.
Located in News / 2015 / December
A Grand Opening
With the dedication of Marsico Hall, UNC ushered in a new era of medical research, collaboration, and promise for the people of North Carolina and beyond.
Located in News / 2014 / March
Building a Better Image
Andrew Tucker, PhD, used his graduate experience at UNC to help build a new kind of mammographic imaging machine now in use in a clinical trial at the North Carolina Cancer Hospital.
Located in News / 2014 / April
New Ultrasound Device May Aid in Detecting Risk for Heart Attack, Stroke
Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed an ultrasound device that could help identify arterial plaque that is at high risk of breaking off and causing heart attack or stroke.
Located in News / 2014 / April
Researchers sneak drugs into cancer cells before triggering release
By waiting to trigger the drug's potency, the method may provide a better route toward treating malignant tumors.
Located in News / 2014 / May