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2015 NC AWHONN Conference Brochure
Located in Employee News Online / / 2015 / March
A dedication to teaching, learning
Recently, the UNC School of Medicine was recognized as one of the nation’s ten best schools for Women’s Health by the U.S. News and World Report. It was the first time the school, which tied for tenth in the specialty, has been recognized for Women’s Health.
Located in Vital Signs / Archives / Vital Signs - April 29, 2010
A dedication to teaching, learning
Recently, the UNC School of Medicine was recognized as one of the nation’s ten best schools for Women’s Health by the U.S. News and World Report. It was the first time the school, which tied for tenth in the specialty, has been recognized for Women’s Health.
Located in Vital Signs / 2010 / Vital Signs - April 29, 2010
A miracle for the Millers
As survivability of many cancers increases, so does the opportunity to help survivors live the lives they’d imagined. Manda Miller thought bouts of Hodgkins Lymphoma at 19 and 27 had taken her chance to have children, but Jennifer Mersereau, MD, at UNC Fertility offered an innovative option for the Millers' miracle baby — a donor egg.
Located in News / 2016 / November
ACNM names UNC Midwives a Triple Aim practice
This is the second consecutive year UNC Midwives has received this designation.
Located in Vital Signs / 2016 / Sept. 1
Alison M. Stuebe, MD
Alison M. Stuebe, MD is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine. She is an expert on diabetes, obesity, gestational weight gain, breastfeeding and mastitis.
Located in For the Media / Experts Guide
Anne Z. Steiner, MD, MPH
Anne Z. Steiner, MD, MPH is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. She is an expert in fertility, egg donation, polycystic ovarian disease, fibroids, in vitro fertilization, hysteroscopy and amenorrhea.
Located in For the Media / Experts Guide
Babies delivered by C-section before 39 weeks more likely to have serious health problems
A new study conducted in part at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that babies delivered by elective Caesarean section before 39 weeks of pregnancy, to mothers who previously had an elective C-section, are much more likely to have serious health problems than newborns delivered under the same circumstances at 39 weeks.
Located in News / 2009 / January
Bae-Jump’s new research explores the origins of racial disparities in endometrial cancer
Victoria Bae-Jump, MD, PhD, was recently awarded grant funding totaling more than $800,000 to further her research on the underlying biological factors that may influence the development and mortality of endometrial cancer in both Caucasian and African-American women.
Located in News / 2018 / May
Blog: Less restrictive guidelines issued on vaginal birth after c-section
Last week the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists released new guidelines that say, “Attempting a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is a safe and appropriate choice for most women who have had a prior cesarean delivery, including for some women who have had two previous cesareans.”
Located in Vital Signs / 2010 / Vital Signs - July 29, 2010