Eyes Up! Phone Down! - UNC Driving and Walking Distracted Campaign

In cooperation with the AT&T “It Can Wait” campaign, UNC Trauma Center, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and UNC Police are hosting a virtual reality event on Feb. 23 in the Children's Hospital lobby.

When Feb 23, 2018
from 09:00 AM to 04:00 PM
Where Children's Hospital Lobby
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In cooperation with the AT&T “It Can Wait” campaign, UNC Trauma Center, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and UNC Police are hosting a virtual reality event on February 21, 22 and 23. You can experience what it is like to drive a virtual reality vehicle while being distracted. It is as close to being in an accident without actually being in an accident, so plan to participate in this fun, but serious experience. Other scheduled distracted driving simulations around campus include:

  • Feb. 21, 2018: Michael Hooker Research Center, Upper Level Atrium - 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Feb. 22, 2018: Carolina Union, West Lobby - 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Walking and driving while distracted has become the new national hazard. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, texting is the most alarming distraction. Sending or reading a text message takes your eyes off the road for five seconds. At 55 miles per hour, that's like driving the length of an entire football field with your eyes closed.

In 2015 alone, 3,477 people were killed, and 391,000 others were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers.

During daylight hours, approximately 660,000 drivers are using cell phones while driving. That creates enormous potential for deaths and injuries on U.S. roads. Teens were the largest age group reported as distracted at the time of fatal crashes.

Distracted walking injuries involving cell phones accounted for an estimated 11,101 injuries between 2000 and 2011, making it a significant safety threat. While cell phone-distracted walking injuries were most common among women and those ages 40 and younger, according to a study by the National Safety Council (NSC), the issue is impacting all age groups. Talking on the phone accounted for 62 percent of injuries, the most common of which were dislocation or fracture, sprains or strains and concussions.

The NSC study also found that the rise in cell phone-distracted walking injuries parallels the eight-fold increase in cell phone use in the last 15 years. It is just as important to walk cell free as it is to drive cell free. Pedestrians and drivers using cell phones are both impaired and too mentally distracted to fully focus on their surroundings.

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