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Should biomedical graduate schools ignore the GRE?

Should biomedical graduate schools ignore the GRE?

UNC research shows test scores don’t forecast productivity or success in graduate programs within the experimental sciences.

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New study identifies most important factors in aesthetic surgery patient decisions

New study identifies most important factors in aesthetic surgery patient decisions

UNC School of Medicine researchers, led by Cindy Wu, MD, used a crowdsourcing model to identify what potential patients value most when seeking an aesthetic surgeon.

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The science of baby’s first sight

The science of baby’s first sight

UNC scientists conduct seminal experiments to unveil how early-in-life visual experiences – simply trying to see – sculpt a particular subnetwork of brain circuitry we need in order to see properly.

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Optogenetics Breakthrough: UNC scientists expand the use of light to control protein activity in cells

Optogenetics Breakthrough: UNC scientists expand the use of light to control protein activity in cells

The new research technique, developed by researchers at the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, has the potential to illuminate the roles of previously inaccessible proteins important for health and disease.

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Start-up with UNC ties secures $2.9 million to develop blood test for cancer

Start-up with UNC ties secures $2.9 million to develop blood test for cancer

A start-up company co-founded by UNC Lineberger researcher Andrew Wang has raised $2.9 million to commercialize a test designed to capture cancer cells circulating in the blood.

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Helping solve a health care shortage

Helping solve a health care shortage

Less than a year after she earned her degree from UNC, Misty Cox is already putting her skills to work — and helping make North Carolinians healthier in the process. Cox, a 2016 UNC-Chapel Hill graduate, is one of 13 fellows participating in MedServe, a program focused on helping solve the problem of health care shortages across North Carolina. The program was co-founded by Patrick O'Shea, a UNC School of Medicine Student.

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A Culinary Christmas

A Culinary Christmas

Each year, Stuart Gold, MD, chief of the Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, works on Christmas. He considers it his duty to be there for the patients and their families on his unit, 5 Children’s, who would rather be at home during the holidays but are undergoing treatment for serious medical conditions including cancer and blood disorders.

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Inside the world of cell signaling: a G-protein breakthrough

Inside the world of cell signaling: a G-protein breakthrough

UNC scientists led by John Sondek, PhD, created a new biochemical tool to block specific types of downstream G-protein signaling, opening new avenues of research and potential drug design and discovery.

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Humbling and Rewarding

Humbling and Rewarding

Brian Nelson’s volunteer service with the American Red Cross took him to Houston, Texas, earlier this year to combat floods. This fall he didn’t have to travel far to help individuals and families struggling through Hurricane Matthew.

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Painting with a Purpose

Painting with a Purpose

Rachel Howard is taking a couple of gap years before applying to medical school. In the meantime, she has found a way to combine her love of art and her interest in medicine by painting windows for patients staying in the Children’s Hospital during the holidays.

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Gerber named Medical Director for Center for Transplant Care, Transplant Clinic

Gerber named Medical Director for Center for Transplant Care, Transplant Clinic

David A. Gerber, MD, FACS, Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplant Surgery, has been named Director of the UNC Center for Transplant Care and the UNC Hospitals Jason Ray Transplant Clinic.

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2016: Our Favorite Stories

2016: Our Favorite Stories

It’s that time of year. Time to look back as a staff to revisit our favorite UNC School of Medicine and UNC Health Care stories from 2016.

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White matter structure in the brain predicts cognitive function at ages 1 and 2

White matter structure in the brain predicts cognitive function at ages 1 and 2

This kind of new brain imaging study could help identify cognitive problems and psychiatric disorders very early and develop appropriate interventions.

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 For invasive breast cancer, researchers identify biomarkers of treatment response

For invasive breast cancer, researchers identify biomarkers of treatment response

UNC Lineberger researchers reported at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium they have identified biomarkers they believe can be used as part of a larger model to predict how patients with HER2-positive operative breast cancer will respond to the targeted treatment trastuzumab, commercially known as Herceptin, and chemotherapy.

For invasive breast cancer, researchers identify biomarkers of treatment response - Read More…

Cigar warning labels are not equally believable among adolescents

Cigar warning labels are not equally believable among adolescents

Less than 50 percent of surveyed teens found it ‘very believable’ that cigars are not a safe alternative to cigarettes, according to a first-of-its-kind UNC School of Medicine study.

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Scientists find new way to reverse immune suppression caused by HIV

Scientists find new way to reverse immune suppression caused by HIV

By blocking a specific cell signaling pathway in lab animals, researchers reversed signs of chronic immune activation, thereby boosting T-cell recovery and viral suppression.

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 Genetic alterations more common in tumors of older patients with metastatic breast cancer

Genetic alterations more common in tumors of older patients with metastatic breast cancer

In preliminary findings presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, researchers showed that older patients were as likely as younger patients to receive targeted therapy and enroll in therapeutic trials based on their sequencing results.

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 Researchers developing model to predict if chemotherapy will work for aggressive breast cancer

Researchers developing model to predict if chemotherapy will work for aggressive breast cancer

In a study presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, UNC Lineberger researchers led by Katherine Hoadley, PhD, reported they developed a model that can predict which triple negative breast cancer patients will respond to chemotherapy.

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 Brain metastasis persists despite improved targeted treatment for HER2 breast cancer

Brain metastasis persists despite improved targeted treatment for HER2 breast cancer

At this year's San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, UNC Lineberger researchers and collaborators shared the outcomes of their investigation into the incidence of brain metastasis after a series of drugs were approved to treat HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, starting with trastuzumab, also known as Herceptin, in the United States in 1998.

Brain metastasis persists despite improved targeted treatment for HER2 breast cancer - Read More…