January

Risk genes for Alzheimer’s and mental illness linked to brain changes at birth

Risk genes for Alzheimer’s and mental illness linked to brain changes at birth

This study by UNC School of Medicine researchers is the first to report the impact of common gene variants on brain structure in newborns.

Risk genes for Alzheimer’s and mental illness linked to brain changes at birth - Read More…

RN: Real Nurses - the year in review

RN: Real Nurses - the year in review

The UNC nurses we met in 2012 give 100 percent of themselves to their work - and to their lives away from work.

RN: Real Nurses - the year in review - Read More…

Sublingual immunotherapy shows promise as treatment for peanut allergy

Sublingual immunotherapy shows promise as treatment for peanut allergy

Daily doses of a liquid containing peanut powder, in gradually increasing amounts, enabled patients with peanut allergy to safely consume peanut in amounts at least 10 times greater than their baseline.

Sublingual immunotherapy shows promise as treatment for peanut allergy - Read More…

Setting the stage for a new paradigm in treatment of heart failure

Setting the stage for a new paradigm in treatment of heart failure

New evidence shows the root of heart failure lies in misfolded proteins in the heart’s cells, according to UNC researchers. The finding may pave the way for dramatically new treatment approaches.

Setting the stage for a new paradigm in treatment of heart failure - Read More…

Dark matter made visible before the final cut

Dark matter made visible before the final cut

Research findings from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine are shining a light on an important regulatory role performed by the so-called dark matter, or “junk DNA,” within each of our genes.

Dark matter made visible before the final cut - Read More…

real doctors, real people - Keith Burridge

real doctors, real people - Keith Burridge

Keith Burridge, a Kenan Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, is also a playwright.

real doctors, real people - Keith Burridge - Read More…

Klinger wins $450K grant to measure outcomes for adults with ASD

Klinger wins $450K grant to measure outcomes for adults with ASD

Laura Klinger, PhD, Principal Investigator of the study and Executive Director of TEACCH, will use the grant from Autism Speaks to conduct a landmark 40-year follow-up study of individuals served by the TEACCH Autism Program. Mark Klinger, PhD, and Joseph Piven, MD, are co-investigators on the study.

Klinger wins $450K grant to measure outcomes for adults with ASD - Read More…

Expected decline in liver transplants due to lower quality donor liver

A study led by Eric S. Orman, MD, published in the January 2013 issue of the journal Liver Transplantation, found that the non-use of donor livers climbed through 2010 due to a worsening of donor liver quality, primarily from donation following cardiac death.

Expected decline in liver transplants due to lower quality donor liver - Read More…

Sherman Riggsbee: Boosting Spirits Every Day

Sherman Riggsbee: Boosting Spirits Every Day

A Chatham County native who has weathered more than his share of life’s disappointments is a constant role model of compassion and encouragement for many, but none more so than the guests and fellow staff members at SECU Family House where he is resident manager.

Sherman Riggsbee: Boosting Spirits Every Day - Read More…

Molecular twist helps regulate the cellular message to make histone proteins

Molecular twist helps regulate the cellular message to make histone proteins

In a collaborative effort published online in the January 18, 2013 issue of the journal Science, researchers at the University of North Carolina and Columbia University show for the first time how two key proteins in messenger RNA communicate via a molecular twist to help maintain the balance of histones to DNA.

Molecular twist helps regulate the cellular message to make histone proteins - Read More…

UNC researchers use luminescent mice to track cancer and aging in real-time

UNC researchers use luminescent mice to track cancer and aging in real-time

The UNC team led by Norman Sharpless, MD, Wellcome Distinguished Professor of Cancer Research and Deputy Cancer Center Director, has developed a strain of mice that turns on a gene from fireflies when the normal p16 gene is activated.

UNC researchers use luminescent mice to track cancer and aging in real-time - Read More…

RN: Real Nurses - Bela Emory

RN: Real Nurses - Bela Emory

Bela Emory, RN, CPN, BSN has been a nurse at UNC Hospital for more than 25 years working the night shift in Pediatrics. When she's not at the hospital, Bela spends much of her time helping her husband with his antiques business and loves collecting Campbell's soup advertisements.

RN: Real Nurses - Bela Emory - Read More…

CAMTS UNC Air Care accreditation notice

The Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS) will conduct an accreditation site visit of UNC Air Care on Feb. 18 and 19. The purpose of the site visit will be to evaluate the program’s compliance with nationally established medical transport standards.

CAMTS UNC Air Care accreditation notice - Read More…

Study eyes stem cell blood test to detect macular degeneration progression

Study eyes stem cell blood test to detect macular degeneration progression

A study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine is the foundation for a promising new blood test to detect the progression of macular degeneration to its more serious form, which can lead to blindness.

Study eyes stem cell blood test to detect macular degeneration progression - Read More…

Immune cell suicide alarm helps destroy escaping bacteria

Immune cell suicide alarm helps destroy escaping bacteria

A University of North Carolina School of Medicine study may have implications for thwarting the effects of bioterrorism attack with lethal microbes, as well as finding a way to save people in septic shock, an overwhelming bacterial infection of the blood.

Immune cell suicide alarm helps destroy escaping bacteria - Read More…

Study of human specimen collections in the U.S. offers a first look at their huge diversity

Study of human specimen collections in the U.S. offers a first look at their huge diversity

A new study from the UNC School of Medicine reveals the huge diversity of U.S. biobanks and also raises questions about the best way to manage and govern them.

Study of human specimen collections in the U.S. offers a first look at their huge diversity - Read More…

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