The Med Student from Oak Creek Village

This month’s Real Medicine story is about a second year medical student at UNC named Kate Magee. A Raleigh, N.C. native, she’s also the recipient of an Albert Schweitzer fellowship.

“I saw a need among the young girls in the community to have a mentor and positive role model in their lives,” Magee said. So, she started a group for them called Godly Running Girls.
One of the Godly Running Girls paints a gourd as part of a group activity.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

The North Carolina Albert Schweitzer Fellows Program is a one-year interdisciplinary, mentored fellowship program focused on health-related community service and leadership development.

Founded in 1994, the North Carolina Schweitzer Fellows Program is one of eleven Schweitzer program sites across the U.S. dedicated to developing a pipeline of emerging professionals who enter the workforce with the skills and commitment necessary to address unmet health needs.

The life Kate lives as a med student is a full one, there's no doubt about it. There’s studying, classes, and more studying. But what makes it fulfilling for Kate is what makes our story this month worth watching. She hangs out with neighbors from Iraq, Somalia, Mexico (and many other countries around the world) who all offer intriguing conversations.  She shares her life with her neighbors along with other American friends who together serve the community not only through access to health care via the Samaritan Health Center's (SHC) Mobile Clinic but also through a group they started called, Godly Running Girls.  

“I saw a need among the young girls in the community to have a mentor and positive role model in their lives,” she says. “They need constructive things to do after school. Improving their physical health through exercising and healthier eating while also sparking some spiritual interest were ways I could help.”

Watch this month’s story to meet some of Kate's neighbors and to see how living in such a diverse environment has re-shaped Kate's approach to medicine.

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