Garret Stuber Named Co-Recipient of the Waletzky Award

The Jacob P. Waletzky Award is given to a young scientist (within 15 years of his/her PhD or MD degree) whose independent research has led to significant conceptual and empirical contributions to the understanding of drug addiction.

Garret Stuber Named Co-Recipient of the Waletzky Award click to enlarge Garret Stuber, PhD

November 1, 2017

Garret Stuber, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and cell biology & physiology in the UNC School of Medicine and a member of the UNC Neuroscience Center, has been named a co-recipient of  the Jacob P. Waletzky Award, which is given by the Society for Neuroscience.  

Supported by the Waletzky Award Prize Fund and the Waletzky Family, this $25,000 award recognizes young scientists who have conducted or plan to conduct independent research leading to significant conceptual and empirical contributions to the understanding of drug addiction. Scientists eligible for this award must have conducted or an established plan to conduct independent research within 15 years of receiving their PhD or MD degree.

The award will be presented at Neuroscience 2017, SfN’s annual meeting and the world’s largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. The other co-recipient is  Karen Ersche, PhD, of Cambridge University in England. 

“It is important to recognize the work of scientists combatting the global crisis of drug addiction,” SfN President Eric Nestler said. “We could not have two candidates more deserving of this year’s Waletzky Award than Karen Ersche and Garret Stuber, who have illumined new approaches to treatment and a more foundational understanding of how drug addiction affects the brain, respectively.” 

In the seven years since Stuber started his lab, he has become internationally known for his work characterizing neural circuits underlying behaviors associated with addiction, depression, and eating disorders.

Stuber, who was named a Yang Family Biomedical Scholar in 2016, has contributed to knowledge of specific circuits and neurotransmitters associated with addictive behaviors and of how drug abuse modulates neural coding dynamics. He pioneered cell-level resolution in vivo calcium imaging, and his addiction research has led to the development and use of optogenetic technologies and provided insight into how synaptic plasticity is involved in drug addiction. 

You can read more about Stuber’s career as a young scientist and his work at the UNC School of Medicine in this Five Questions feature.

The Society for Neuroscience (SfN) is an organization of nearly 37,000 basic scientists and clinicians who study the brain and nervous system.

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