Dayton, Kibbe, Sims inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite

The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the induction of Paul Dayton, PhD, Melina Kibbe, MD, and Christopher Sims, MD, into its College of Fellows.

Dayton, Kibbe, Sims inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite click to enlarge Paul Dayton, Melina Kibbe, Christopher Sims

The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the induction of Paul Dayton, PhD, Melina Kibbe, MD, and Christopher Sims, MD into its College of Fellows.

Election to the AIMBE College of Fellows is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to a medical and biological engineer. The College of Fellows is comprised of the top two percent of medical and biological engineers and membership honors those who have made “outstanding contributions to engineering and medical research, practice, or education” and to “the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of medical and biological engineering, or developing /implementing innovative approaches to bioengineering education.

Paul Dayton, PhD, is the Associate Chair of the UNC and NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering and a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dayton and his research team are developing methods for high-resolution, non-invasive ultrasound technology that uses sound to detect cancer by taking advantage of the unusual bendiness, or tortuosity, of blood vessels supplying tumors. In one of these novel technologies, called “acoustic angiography,” researchers bounce sound waves off microbubbles that are flowing through the blood vessels. The sound waves hit the microbubbles, the bubbles vibrate, and send sound waves back at a different frequency than the rest of the surrounding tissue. The researchers can capture those sound waves distinctly, and translate them into images, which show differences between healthy and cancerous tissue.

Melina Kibbe, MD, is Colin G. Thomas, Jr Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Surgery. Kibbe’s research interests focus on developing novel therapies for patients with vascular disease while simultaneously studying the mechanism of how these therapies impact the vascular wall. In addition, Kibbe is a nationally recognized advocate for gender equity in biomedical research. She was recognized for her "outstanding contributions to surgery and vascular biology and for engineering solutions to improve patients' lives."

Christopher Sims, MD, MPH, is Professor of Chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences and Adjunct Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology. Sims’ research is based on a multidisciplinary and translational effort that brings to bear principles and techniques from chemistry, engineering, and medicine.  A common thread in his research is the development and application of new technologies for biomedical research with a goal for clinical translation.

Dayton, Kibbe, and Sims were all nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows. A formal induction ceremony was held during the AIMBE Annual Meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on April 9. The three UNC School of Medicine faculty members were among 156 inducted in this year’s class of fellows.

About AIMBE

AIMBE is the authoritative voice and advocate for the value of medical and biological engineering to society. AIMBE’s mission is to recognize excellence, advance the public understanding, and accelerate medical and biological innovation. No other organization can bring together academic, industry, government, and scientific societies to form a highly influential community advancing medical and biological engineering. AIMBE’s mission drives advocacy initiatives into action on Capitol Hill and beyond.

More information about the AIMBE is available at www.aimbe.org

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