Piven honored with Ruane Prize for autism research

At an awards dinner in New York City, Joseph Piven was named co-recipient of the Ruane Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Research by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation.

Piven honored with Ruane Prize for autism research click to enlarge Joseph Piven, MD (photo by Chad David Kraus)

Joseph Piven, MD, director of the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (CIDD), received the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation’s prestigious Ruane Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Research. The award includes a $50,000 prize, which Piven will share with co-recipient Ami Klin, PhD, director of the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta.

The award was initiated in 2000 by philanthropists Joy and William Ruane to recognize important advances in understanding and treating early-onset brain and behavior disorders. Read more about the awards dinner here.

Piven is the Thomas E. Castelloe Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics and executive committee member of the UNC Autism Research Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Since 2002 he has led an NIH Autism Center of Excellence at UNC Chapel Hill, a program that supports large-scale research aimed at elucidating our understanding of autism spectrum disorder.

He is an expert on the causes and mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. His current primary focus is in leading the multi-center ‘Infant Brain Imaging Study (IBIS)’ on brain and behavior development in infants at high risk for later development of autism.

Piven, who has been at Carolina since 1999, received his medical degree from the University of Maryland and completed residencies in general and child and adolescent psychiatry at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. He completed a John Merck Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Psychiatric Genetics at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. 

Last year, three papers on which Piven was senior author, were in the top 10 research papers of 2017, according to the autism advocacy group Autism Speaks.

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