September

Preliminary Data from Groundbreaking Genome Editing Clinical Trial Encouraging
As part of the phase 1 clinical trial for patients with Hunter syndrome, Joseph Muenzer, MD, PhD, performed the UNC Clinical Translational and Research Center's first-ever in vivo genome editing therapy, achieving a milestone in his own career.
For her father, Morgan runs to support cancer research
Katie Morgan, PharmD, a clinical pharmacist working with neuro-oncology and genitourinary-oncology patients at the N.C. Cancer Hospital, found her calling during her father's four-year battle with glioblastoma. To honor him and others fighting brain cancer, Morgan is running in the Head for the Cure 5K, which will be held Sept. 8 in Chapel Hill to raise money for brain cancer research.
Smith awarded $8.5 million to compare treatments for recurrent bladder cancer
UNC Lineberger’s Angela B. Smith, MD, MS, an associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Urology and director of urologic oncology, and her collaborators were awarded a contract from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to compare bladder removal with medical therapy in bladder cancer patients.
Johnson Honored with Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award
Gary Johnson, PhD, the Kenan Distinguished Professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Pharmacology, and co-director of UNC Lineberger’s Molecular Therapeutics Program was awarded the 2017-2018 Hyman L. Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award.
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) associated with shorter hospital stay, more frequent discharge to home
In a new study, John Vavalle, MD, and colleagues, found that TAVR may lead to improved patient outcomes and lower health care costs.
Scientists Create Method to Map Vast Unknown Territory of Long Non-coding RNA
UNC School of Medicine researchers led by Mauro Calabrese, PhD, have developed a way to categorize mysterious RNA molecules by their likely function, a big first step toward quickening the discovery of their roles in human health and diseases, such as cancers.
UNC Health Care Providing Free Access to UNC Urgent Care 24/7 for Hurricane Victims
Hurricane Florence victims in North Carolina can access medical care around-the-clock
UNC School of Medicine Hosts Annual White Coat Ceremony
The UNC School of Medicine’s Class of 2022 received their white coats at the annual event.
Findings could improve treatment for challenging acute leukemia in children
There is no consensus on the best way to treat mixed phenotype acute leukemia, a rare blood cancer with survival rates of between 47 and 75 percent for children. Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, led by Thomas Alexander, MD, MPH, have made important discoveries about the genetics of this disease that could lead to better treatments.
UNC Health Care Extends Free Access Period to Virtual Care Service for Hurricane Victims
Fees Waived through September 23rd
Anti-inflammatory Protein Promotes Healthy Gut Bacteria to Curb Obesity
UNC School of Medicine researchers led by Jenny Ting, PhD, and colleagues, publish a new approach to weight loss and diabetes prevention.
UNC Researchers Awarded Emerging Challenges Grants
UNC School of Medicine, UNC Medical Center, and NC TraCS Institute awarded $50,000 to two teams of researchers led by Jill Bates, PharmD, Alison Stuebe, MD, and Ana Whitney, MS, to study pharmacogenomics and social determinants of maternal health.
UNC School of Medicine Study Shows Surprise Low-level Ozone Impact on Asthma Patients
Michelle Hernandez, MD, associate medical director of the N.C. Children’s Allergy & Asthma Center, led a study that followed 23 asthma patients in North Carolina to show that even with optimized treatment for persistent asthma, patients experienced respiratory and systemic effects from exposure to low levels of ozone.
UNC Researchers Find Racial Disparities in Treatment for Heart Attack Patients
Sameer Arora, MD, a UNC School of Medicine cardiology fellow, led a study reviewing hospitalizations for a certain type of heart attack that occurred over a 15-year period and found consistent differences in the treatment of black and white patients.
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