Fiscus Co-Authors Article on Physician Burnout

Lynne Fiscus, MD, MPH, Chief Value Officer (CVO) and Executive Medical Director of UNC Physicians Network, is a co-author of an article published in Annals of Internal Medicine that estimates physician burnout costs the U.S. health care system $4.6 billion a year.

Fiscus Co-Authors Article on Physician Burnout click to enlarge Lynne Fiscus, MD, MPH

May 27, 2019

Lynne Fiscus, MD, MPH, Chief Value Officer (CVO) and Executive Medical Director of UNC Physicians Network, is a co-author of an article published in Annals of Internal Medicine that estimates physician burnout costs the U.S. health care system $4.6 billion a year.  

Physician burnout is a significant issue that has the potential to dramatically increase the cost of care to both patients and the health care delivery system. It is associated with poorer overall quality of patient care, lower patient satisfaction, and malpractice lawsuits, all of which have economic impact. Despite the recent public interest the subject, only a few studies have attempted to quantify the economic magnitude of burnout in the form of easily understandable metrics. Without data, policymakers cannot holistically assess or address the issue.

Dr. Fiscus was part of a research team that also included members from the National University of Singapore, Stanford University, the Mayo Clinic, and the American Medical Association, which developed a mathematical model using contemporary published research findings and industry reports to estimate burnout-associated costs related to physician turnover and reduced clinical hours at national and organizational levels. They found that on a national scale, physician burnout accounted for approximately $4.6 billion, or about $7,600 per employed physician per year. According to the researchers, these findings suggest that there may be substantial economic value for policy and organizational expenditures directed at reducing physician burnout.

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