Nov. 1 - 5

Health Care Law Could Mandate Free Contraception
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/11/01/health/main7010471.shtml
The Associated Press
..."There is clear and incontrovertible evidence that family planning saves lives and improves health," said obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. David Grimes, an international family planning expert who teaches medicine at the University of North Carolina. "Contraception rivals immunization in dollars saved for every dollar invested. Spacing out children allows for optimal pregnancies and optimal child rearing. Contraception is a prototype of preventive medicine."

U.S. Says Genes Should Not Be Eligible for Patents
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/30/business/30drug.html?_r=1&scp=7&sq=%22University%20of%20north%20carolina%22&st=cse
The New York Times
...However, the government suggested such a change would have limited impact on the biotechnology industry because man-made manipulations of DNA, like methods to create genetically modified crops or gene therapies, could still be patented. Dr. James P. Evans, a professor of genetics and medicine at the University of North Carolina, who headed a government advisory task force on gene patents, called the government’s brief “a bit of a landmark, kind of a line in the sand.”

Anorexic women more likely to have unwanted pregnancies, abortions
http://www.heraldsun.com/view/full_story/10109746/article-Anorexic-women-more-likely-to-have-unwanted-pregnancies--abortions?instance=main_article
The Chapel Hill Herald
A new study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Norwegian researchers has found that women with anorexia nervosa are much more likely to have both unplanned pregnancies and induced abortions than women who don't have the serious eating disorder. These results may be driven by a mistaken belief among women with anorexia that they can't get pregnant because they are either not having menstrual periods at all or are having irregular periods, said Cynthia M. Bulik, the study's lead author and director of the UNC Eating Disorders Program.
Related Link:
http://www.wral.com/lifestyles/healthteam/story/8533538/

UNC Hospitals urge 'ring of immunity' for flu defense
http://www.newsobserver.com/2010/10/30/769722/unc-hospitals-urge-ring-of-immunity.html
The News & Observer (Raleigh)
Almost everyone is now recommended to get a flu shot, but infants and others who can't get the vaccine are among the most vulnerable to severe illness. That's why doctors at UNC Hospitals are working to build a protective barrier around them, vaccinating their family members and others who routinely spend time with them. "The best way to protect them is build a ring of immunity around them," said Dr. Mike Steiner, a pediatrician at N.C. Children's Hospital. "The only way to get influenza is from contact with someone who has it. You don't get it just out of the blue."
 
Tiny gadget can help doctors retrieve sponges

http://www.newsobserver.com/2010/11/01/773065/tiny-gadget-can-help-doctors-retrieve.html
The News & Observer (Raleigh)
What's the difference between an RFO and a UFO? RFOs are more common. Retained foreign objects, or RFOs, are instruments and tools that surgeons forget inside their patients. About one in every 5,500 patients who underwent surgery at the Mayo Clinic over a three-year period was wheeled into the recovery room with a forgotten object inside, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. ..."That's the crux," said Dr. Christopher Rupp, a gastrointestinal surgeon at UNC Health Care in Chapel Hill.

Hospital food? Don't turn your nose up if UNC Hospital chefs prepare it
http://www.heraldsun.com/view/full_story/10099698/article-Hospital-food--Don-t-turn-your-nose-up-if-UNC-Hospital-chefs-prepare-it?instance=main_article
The Herald-Sun (Durham)
If you live in Chapel Hill or Durham, you just might want to think about dropping those "hospital food" jokes. On Friday, a UNC/Rex Hospitals team was awarded first place and a gold medal in the "Cut to the Core" hospital culinary competition hosted by Johnson & Wales University and celebrity chef Alton Brown of The Food Network. A team that included Duke Hospital placed third overall and won a silver medal.

Anorexia, unplanned pregnancies linked
http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2010/11/01/Anorexia-unplanned-pregnancies-linked/UPI-97541288656730/
United Press International
Women with anorexia nervosa are more likely to have unplanned pregnancies, U.S. and Norwegian researchers say. Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health found unplanned pregnancies were reported by 50 percent of women in the study with the eating disorder versus 18.9 percent of women without it. Study lead author Cynthia Bulik suggests a woman with anorexia nervosa may mistakenly believe she can't become pregnant because she isn't having a menstrual period due to her anorexia.

Gene Patent Ruling Raises Questions for Industry
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/02/health/02gene.html?partner=rss&emc=rss
The New York Times
When the Justice Department declared in a court filing late Friday that genes should not be eligible for patents because they are products of nature, Harold C. Wegner, an influential patent lawyer in Washington, did not mince words. ...James P. Evans, a professor of genetics and medicine at the University of North Carolina who has studied gene patents, said that there were mainly two companies, Myriad and Athena Diagnostics, that based their business on offering expensive genetic tests protected from competition by gene patents.

HIV/AIDS test leverages early detection to stem spread of infection

http://www.suntimes.com/business/2855898,CST-NWS-INNO02B.article
The Chicago Sun-Times (Illinois)
..."A significant percentage of new HIV infections are transmitted by someone with an undetected acute infection, so identifying more people earlier offers a significant opportunity for counseling, which can reduce high-risk behaviors and also initiate antiretroviral treatment for early-stage infection, if appropriate," said Peter Leone, M.D., medical director of the North Carolina HIV/STD Prevention and Control Branch at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

The Tipsy Gene
http://wunc.org/tsot/archive/the-tipsy-gene/view
"The State of Things" WUNC-FM
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine recently discovered new information about how alcohol affects the brain. The scientific team led by Dr. Kirk Wilhelmsen uncovered a gene variant in 10-20% of the population that protects against alcoholism by making a person feel more inebriated than most after just a few drinks. Wilhelmsen joins host Frank Stasio to talk about the so-called “tipsy gene” and how this medical discovery matters to understanding alcoholism.

Abbott earns honor for HIV test

http://newssun.suntimes.com/business/2199861-420/hiv-abbott-chicago-test-innovation.html
The Chicago Sun-Times (Illinois)
Abbott Laboratories has been named a winner in this year’s Chicago Innovation Awards. ...“A significant percentage of new HIV infections are transmitted by someone with an undetected acute infection, so identifying more people earlier offers a significant opportunity for counseling, which can reduce high-risk behaviors and also initiate antiretroviral treatment for early-stage infection, if appropriate,” said Dr. Peter Leone, medical director of the North Carolina HIV/STD Prevention and Control Branch at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Anorexia Linked With Unplanned Pregnancies
http://www.businessweek.com/lifestyle/content/healthday/645289.html
HealthDay News
Women with anorexia nervosa are much more likely to have unplanned pregnancies and abortions than women without the eating disorder, a study of Norwegian women has found. This may be due to the mistaken belief that women with anorexia can't get pregnant because they have irregular menstrual periods or no periods at all, said study lead author Cynthia M. Bulik, director of the eating disorders program at the University of North Carolina.

Fertility kits can mislead women
http://www.newsobserver.com/2010/11/04/779622/fertility-kits-can-mislead-women.html
The News & Observer (Raleigh)
Home fertility tests may not be reliable predictors of a woman's ability to get pregnant, researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill have found. The group, led by Dr. Anne Z. Steiner, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, found that the do-it-yourself kits often indicated women would have difficulties, yet many had no problem conceiving.

UNC medical school's expansion to Charlotte benefits all (Column)

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/11/05/1812623/unc-medical-schools-expansion.html
The Charlotte Observer
From William Roper, dean of the UNC School of Medicine and CEO of the UNC Health Care System: On Oct. 16, I joined representatives from the UNC School of Medicine, Carolinas HealthCare System, Charlotte Area Health Education Center and UNC Charlotte to celebrate the official expansion of the UNC School of Medicine to Charlotte. ...More doctors practice where they complete their medical education. It is our hope that by increasing the class size at UNC we will, in turn, increase the number of providers who choose to practice in our state, and more specifically, Charlotte and Mecklenburg County.

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