Week of Sept. 6 - 9, 2010

Study finds doctor-patient disconnect
http://www.boston.com/news/health/articles/2010/09/07/study_finds_doctor_patient_disconnect/?page=1
The Boston Globe
The heart patients at Springfield’s Baystate Medical Center almost all thought the stents used to prop open their arteries would prevent a heart attack. But their doctors had told most of them before the procedure that it would do nothing more than relieve chest pain. ... Patients are not to blame for the misunderstanding about angioplasty and stents, said Dr. Michael Pignone, a medical editor for the Boston-based Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making and a professor at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

Science Briefs
http://www.newsobserver.com/2010/09/06/666747/science-briefs.html#storylink=misearch
The News & Observer (Raleigh)
Even without being loaded with drugs, certain nanoparticles appear to arm a normally benign protein found in the human body with cancer-killer powers, researchers at UNC Chapel Hill report. The finding could lead to a new strategy for targeted cancer therapies, although additional research is necessary to make sure the protein only attacks cancer cells.
 
Free concerts a ‘gift’ to hospital

http://heraldsun.com/view/full_story/9404214/article-Free-concerts-a--gift--to-hospital?
The Herald-Sun (Durham)
Local music teacher and composer Julie Harris plans two free concerts of original music that was created as a gift to UNC Hospitals and as a focus on ovarian cancer awareness. ... The first concert, at UNC Hospitals, will be on Sept. 15, which marks Harris's two-year anniversary of surgery and diagnosis of Stage 3-A ovarian cancer.

Having Kids, Especially Young Ones, Ramps Up Depression
http://wellness.blogs.time.com/2010/09/08/having-kids-especially-young-ones-ramps-up-depression/#ixzz0z2OtEp8e
Time (Blog)
Colic, crying, round-the-clock wakings — is it any wonder that parents experience high rates of depression in the first year after the birth of a child? ... "In the past, there was a belief that pregnancy was protective, but we know now — especially for women — that in the year surrounding birth they are most likely to have a depressive episode, most likely to seek treatment and most likely to be admitted to a psychiatric hospital,” says Elizabeth Bullard, medical director of the Perinatal Mood Disorders Inpatient Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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