May 2 - 6, 2011

Osteopenia doesn't mean osteoporosis — so should you treat it?
http://articles.latimes.com/2011/apr/30/health/la-he-midlife-osteopenia-20110430
The Los Angeles Times
..."Osteopenia is normal — it's like gray hair," says Dr. Nortin Hadler, a rheumatologist at the University of North Carolina and author of "Worried Sick: A Prescription for Health in an Overtreated America." Hadler is one of many experts who say that the definition of osteopenia is overly broad and misleading. The way they see it, all women experience bone loss, but only a minority of those diagnosed with osteopenia are really on their way to developing osteoporosis.

How much medical testing is too much?
http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-midlife-screenings-20110502,0,658846.story
The Los Angeles Times
...Dr. Nortin Hadler, a rheumatologist at the University of North Carolina and author of "Worried Sick: A Prescription for Health in an Overtreated America," estimates that only about 20% of our health and life expectancy is based on risk factors for disease; the other 80% can be boiled down to quality of life, which Hadler sums up with two questions: "Are you happy in your socioeconomic status, and do you like your job? It's very powerful."

Link In Autism, Brain Size
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704436004576299371343861618.html?mod=googlenews_wsj
The Wall Street Journal
...A 2005 study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that 2-year-old children with autism have brains up to 10% larger than children without autism. The study compared the brains of 59 children with autism and 38 without autism. Researchers followed that group and had many of them undergo another magnetic resonance imaging scan when they were 4- or 5-years-old. The study found that children who had enlarged brains at age 2 continued to have enlarged brains at ages 4 and 5, but that the rate of growth hadn't increased compared to brains of children without autism.

Brain Overgrowth in Tots Is Linked to Autism
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/05/03/brain-overgrowth-tots-linked-autism/
Fox News
The brains of children who have autism spectrum disorder are larger than those of other children, a difference that seems to arise before they are 2 years old, according to a new study. In 2005, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that 2-year-old children with autism had brains up to 10 percent larger than other children of the same age. This new study reveals that the children with enlarged brains at age 2 continued to have enlarged brains at ages 4 and 5, but by no more than the amount at age 2.

Brains of Autistic Kids Still Larger at Age 4, 5
http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/brain-and-behavior/articles/2011/05/02/brains-of-autistic-kids-still-larger-at-age-4-5
HealthDay News
"Our prior paper found that at age 2, children with autism had brain overgrowth, meaning their brains were larger than the comparison children," said study author Heather Cody Hazlett, an assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill School of Medicine.

For autistic children, brain size is bigger
http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-autism-brain-size-20110503,0,6445646.story
The Los Angeles Times
Children with autism have slightly bigger brains than children without autism by age 2, research has shown. And a new study has found that, though the enlargement continues, the increased growth does not.  Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found in 2005 that 2-year-olds with autism had brains that were 5% to 10% larger than children without the neurological condition, but didn’t know if the autistic children’s brains continued to enlarge relative to their peers’.

Brain Size of Children Yields Clues to Autism
http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/news/20110502/brain-size-of-children-yields-clues-to-autism
Web MD
Researchers from the University of North Carolina also report that the brain overgrowth in kids who develop autism occurs in the temporal lobe white matter of the brain. This finding could lead to a better understanding of the genes that drive autism, which, in turn, could lead to earlier identification and treatment of the disorder, study researcher Joseph Piven, MD, tells WebMD.

Brain Size, Early Growth: Clues to Autism's Causes
http://healthland.time.com/2011/05/03/brain-size-early-growth-clues-to-autisms-causes/
Time - Healthland
Heather Hazlett, in the department of psychiatry at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, and her colleagues studied MRI images of 38 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at 2 years old and compared them with the scans from 21 unaffected youngsters of the same age.

What Teens Want: If Given 3 Wishes...
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/05/04/teens-want-given-3-wishes/
Fox News
..."We went into the study with the typical stereotypes expecting to find a lot about girls' wishes to lose 10 pounds or other appearance-related things, and boys wanting to be NFL stars or to play hoops," said Eliana Perrin, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and pediatrician at the hospital. She uses these survey questions to get know her patients.

Startup incubators with lab space talked in Chapel Hill
http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/print-edition/2011/04/29/startup-incubators-with-lab-space.html
The Triangle Business Journal
Discussions are under way about establishing two incubators in Chapel Hill that would provide wet lab space for UNC-Chapel Hill life science spinoff companies, filling a void left by the inability of the university to launch its proposed satellite research campus, Carolina North. ...Don Rose, director of Carolina KickStart, a program in UNC’s Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute, says, “If you talk to anybody with a wet lab company, they end up going out to (Research Triangle Park) or Durham.”

Simple Question Sheds Light on Teens' Hopes, Dreams
http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/brain-and-behavior/articles/2011/05/04/simple-question-sheds-light-on-teens-hopes-dreams
HealthDay News
Adults often find it hard to fathom what teenagers are thinking, but simply asking teens about their wishes and hopes revealed some interesting trends, researchers report..."Despite what we thought going into the study, only about 8 percent of adolescent wishes were about personal appearance, with only 4 percent wishing to be thinner," study senior author Dr. Eliana M. Perrin...

Study: Risk of fractures from medications designed to strengthen bones
http://www.9news.com/news/world/196875/347/Study-Risk-of-fractures-from-medications-designed-to-strengthen-bones-?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|t
9news
Dr. Margaret Gourlay treats women at risk for osteoporosis at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She says the new study of more than a thousand women shows the benefits of bisphosphonates outweigh any risk.

Link between diabetes, high-fat diet clarified
http://www.drugstorenews.com/article/link-between-diabetes-high-fat-diet-clarified?utm_source=GoogleNews&utm_medium=Syndication&utm_campaign=ManualSitemap
Drug Store News
Led by UNC at Chapel Hill School of Medicine professor Jenny Ting, the team found that the key contributor to Type 2 diabetes is a diet high in saturated fat, but not unsaturated fat.

Dome: Five Democrats help pass GOP's budget
http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/05/05/1176054/five-democrats-help-pass-gops.html
News & Observer
Dr. David Grimes, a clinical professor at the UNC School of Medicine who has performed abortions, called the ultrasound provision "totally gratuitous." He said the bill "implies a vast conspiracy among us doctors to withhold information."

Few Babies in Child-Care Centers Receive Breast Milk: Study
http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/childrens-health/articles/2011/05/06/few-babies-in-child-care-centers-receive-breast-milk-study
HealthDay News
..."The findings speak to the tremendous challenges that women face in being able to successfully breast-feed their babies," said breast-feeding researcher Dr. Alison Stuebe, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. Stuebe agreed that the differences seen between babies from poorer or more affluent homes might be due, in part, to mothers not being able to pump during the workday.

Share This: