Sept. 12 - 16, 2011

Chronic diseases: slow-acting, silent killers?
http://www.contracostatimes.com/california/ci_18862515
The Associated Press
..."The timing is difficult with the economy the way it is, but it should not prevent us from setting goals," said Dr. Sidney Smith, who heads the World Heart Federation, a group of more than 200 organizations focused on heart disease. "Many of the things we're proposing cost very little" and some, such as smoking cessation, even save money, said Smith, a cardiologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "We're not talking about trying to find a new magic bullet. We're just talking about behavior and cost-effective medicines" like aspirin and generic blood pressure drugs that lower the risk of multiple diseases, he said.

WakeMed still stalking Rex Hospital
http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/news/2011/09/12/wakemed-still-stalking-rex-hospital.html
The Triangle Business Journal
Although the University of North Carolina Health Care has rejected an $875 million offer from WakeMed Health & Hospitals to buy Rex Healthcare, WakeMed still wants to reach a deal, saying it can help the state save jobs.

After years of fighting germs, UN to focus on new global killers: heart, lung disease; cancer
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=140455332
The Associated Press
...“The timing is difficult with the economy the way it is, but it should not prevent us from setting goals,” said Dr. Sidney Smith, who heads the World Heart Federation, an umbrella group of more than 200 organizations focused on heart disease. “Many of the things we’re proposing cost very little” and some, such as smoking cessation, even save money, said Smith, a cardiologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “We’re not talking about trying to find a new magic bullet. We’re just talking about behavior and cost-effective medicines” like aspirin and generic blood pressure drugs that lower the risk of multiple diseases, he said.

College student fights colon cancer with study drug
http://www.wral.com/lifestyles/healthteam/story/10102807/
WRAL-TV (CBS/Raleigh)
Many people with advanced-stage colorectal cancer run out of treatment options because their tumors don't respond to chemotherapy or other drugs. Researchers at UNC Hospitals are hopeful that a study drug might offer those patients hope.

Hepatitis Patients Respond Equally Well to Short Course Treatment
http://www.voanews.com/english/news/health/Hepatitis-Patients-Respond-Equally-Well-to-Short-Course-Treatment-129924593.html
Voice of America
...But Michael Fried, a professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, says about 75 percent of H-C-V cases can now be cured with antiviral drugs. “So that’s very encouraging.  And we know that permanent eradication of hepatitis C does lead subsequently to long-term clinical improvement with less likelihood of developing cirrhosis and liver cancer,” Fried said.
Related links:
http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/news/2011/09/15/unc-drug-cuts-hepatitis-treatment-in.html
http://www.chapelboro.com/Study-Proves-Shorter-Hepatitis-C-Treatment-Is-Just/10913672
http://www.dailytarheel.com/index.php/article/2011/09/joint_hepatitis_study_shows_shorter_treatment_effective







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