July 30 - Aug. 3, 2012

International Coverage

Breastfeeding Rates Increase, CDC Finds
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/02/breastfeeding-rates-cdc_n_173c4381.html
The Huffington Post
More moms in the U.S. are breastfeeding their babies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's latest breastfeeding report card. ..."The big picture is that we've seen a really positive shift in policy and breastfeeding promotion, to where we're really talking about the system," said Dr. Alison Stuebe, an OB-GYN and assistant professor of maternal and child health at the University of North Carolina.

National Coverage

Study Cites Benefits of Early AIDS Treatment
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390443931404577553163940719958.html
The Wall Street Journal
...While the two studies didn't examine patients with CD4 counts higher than 550, it points to the benefits of immediate treatment for anyone infected with HIV, said Myron Cohen, vice chancellor for global health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who leads the so-called treatment-as-prevention study.
Related Links
:
http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2012/07/27/new-urgency-momentum-in-search-for-aids-cure/

http://www.nature.com/news/dormant-hiv-gets-rude-awakening-1.11077

http://www.voanews.com/content/cancer_drug_unmasks_hiv_in_immune_cells/1447734.html

Regional Coverage

'Bath salts' conviction opens a sad chapter (Editorial)
http://www.dailymail.com/Opinion/Editorials/201207290109
The Charleston Daily Mail (Charleston, SC)
...And the products may be as addictive as cocaine, according to a study by a research team headed by Dr. C.J. Malanga, an associate professor of neurology, pediatrics and psychology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

State and Local Coverage

UNC scientists use crystallography to ID protein 'pockets' to block hallucinogens
http://www.newsobserver.com/2012/07/29/2222463/unc-scientists-use-crystallography.html#storylink=cpy
The News & Observer (Raleigh)
Psychoactive drugs, which dangerously alter our consciousness, work by binding proteins in our brains and bodies. And though these proteins have been a mystery, new research is illuminating their structures. Now that the proteins’ structure is known, drugs can be developed that could affect their action. In a paper published this spring in the journal Nature, a team of scientists from the University of North Carolina and elsewhere describe the chemical structure of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR).

UNC faculty: Athletic, academic problems not 'malicious'
http://www.wral.com/news/education/story/11365720/
WRAL-TV (CBS/Raleigh)
A day after a faculty panel review by the University of North Carolina was released, other faculty members are speaking out in support of the findings. Lewis Margolis, an associate professor in Maternal and Child Health, said that the report was ”thoughtful” and took a previous internal review to the next level.

Dental students provide free care
http://www.heraldsun.com/view/full_story/19665463/article-Dental-students-provide-free-care?instance=search_results
The Herald-Sun (Durham)
This summer students at the UNC Chapel Hill School of Dentistry provided almost $19,000 worth of free dental care to those in need in the Chapel Hill community. Every Wednesday night for five weeks during summer dental school, students provided screenings, cleanings, extractions and fillings to a total of about 100 patients. Patients who went to the clinic, located in the School of Dentistry’s Tarrson Hall, were selected by lottery at the beginning of the session.

Millions on denial lists will be able to get health policy
http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/print-edition/2012/08/03/millions-on-denial-lists-will-be-able.html
The Triangle Business Journal
...Dr. Brian Goldstein, executive vice president and chief operating officer of UNC Hospitals in Chapel Hill, says, at least in the first few years of health reform, there will be an increased demand for some health services. “Some people will have new coverage to address injuries and illnesses, and others will have better coverage than before,” he reasons.

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