June 18 - 22, 2012

National News

Baby Soap Linked To Infants Testing Positive For Marijuana
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/15/baby-soap-infants-test-positive-marijuana_n_1601439.html
The Huffington Post
A new study out of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill reveals some baby soaps may cause infants to test positive for marijuana, reports My Health News Daily. ... "It's not marijuana in any way, shape or form," said study researcher Catherine Hammett-Stabler, a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of North Carolina.

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Eating disorders are common in older women, study shows.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-06-21/eating-disorders-over-50/55720718/1
USA Today
A first-of-a-kind study looking at older women finds damaging eating disorders are common — and 62% of those surveyed say their weight or shape has a negative impact on their lives. ... "The disorders have serious physical as well as emotional consequences," says lead author Cindy Bulik, director of the eating disorders program at the University of North Carolina. "Part of my goal is to make this an issue all doctors need to be aware of regardless of a women's age. Many think eating disorders end at age 25. They exist at every age, we're finding."
UNC Release: http://news.unchealthcare.org/news/2012/june/eating-disorder-behaviors-and-weight-concerns-are-common-in-women-over-50

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Study in mice indicates an unknown component of human breast milk may kill HIV
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/study-in-mice-indicates-an-unknown-component-of-human-breast-milk-may-kill-hiv/2012/06/18/gJQA5LRklV_story.html
The Washington Post
New research shows that something in breast milk kills HIV particles and infected cells; it also blocks HIV transmission in mice with a human immune system. ... To investigate further, Angela Wahl at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her colleagues created mice with human bone marrow, liver and thymus tissues that all became infected with HIV if the mice were given an oral dose of the virus.

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How Tai Chi increases brain size, memory, and balance in elderly populations
http://www.examiner.com/article/how-tai-chi-increases-brain-size-memory-and-balance-elderly-populations
The Examiner.com
...Their ability to reach while maintaining balance also improved, said Leigh Callahan, PhD, the study's lead author, associate professor in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and a member of UNC's Thurston Arthritis Research Center. According to the November 7, 2010 news release, "Our study shows that there are significant benefits of the Tai Chi course for individuals with all types of arthritis, including fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis," Callahan said.



State and Local News

Secret too big a weight to bear

http://www.chapelhillnews.com/2012/06/17/71789/secret-too-big-a-weight-to-bear.html
The Chapel Hill News/The News & Observer (Raleigh)
...Hill is one of eight HIV-positive patients in an ongoing study at UNC, where researchers are using a drug used to treat lymphoma to lure the virus out of hiding. Researchers will examine the immune system’s response to the virus and the drug’s affect on the body.


Questions remain on state’s role in health care (Guest Column)
http://www.herald-sun.com/view/full_story/19024788/article-Questions-remain-on-state%E2%80%99s-role-in-health-care?instance=search_results
The Herald-Sun (Durham)
Last month, regional health care giants UNC Health Care and WakeMed hospitals announced an agreement ending a year and a half of open hostilities. At a May 22 press conference, the two agreed to stop publicly complaining about each other and to give up plans for hostile takeovers. Leaders of the two entities smiled for the cameras, and state legislators, who helped hammer out the deal, rejoiced. UNC leaders called it a “win-win” solution.


UNC: Eating disorders common in women over 50
http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/story?section=news/health&id=8709427
WTVD-TV (ABC/Raleigh)
A new study from scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine shows age is no barrier when it comes to disordered eating. ... "We know very little about how women aged 50 and above feel about their bodies," said Cynthia Bulik, PhD, director of the Eating Disorders Program in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "An unfortunate assumption is that they 'grow out of' body dissatisfaction and eating disorders, but no one has really bothered to ask. Since most research focuses on younger women our goal was to capture the concerns of women in this age range to inform future research and service planning."


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