Sept. 10 - 14

AIDS science leaping ahead, but will the money follow?
http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/09/09/aids-funding-idINDEE88802420120909
Reuters (Wire Service)
Last year, the HIV/AIDS community got some startling news. Lifesaving drugs known as antiretrovirals that have brought millions of AIDS sufferers back from the brink also dramatically cut the risk that they will transmit the virus to their loved ones - by as much as 96 percent. ..."The study demonstrates tremendous benefit in early and probably immediate treatment of people who are tested positive for HIV, b e fore their health is compromised, to render them non-infectious as well," said Dr. Myron Cohen, an HIV/AIDS researcher at the University of North Carolina and leader of the trial.

CNN Fact Check: Would Romney bankrupt Medicare by 2016?
http://articles.cnn.com/2012-09-07/politics/politics_pol-fact-check-medicare_1_medicare-part-medicare-insolvency-trust-fund/3
CNN.com
...University of North Carolina professor Jonathan Oberlander, a Medicare historian, said that repealing the Affordable Care Act "would in fact worsen Medicare's financial condition" and move up the projected date for the Part A trust fund's insolvency. But "Medicare is not going bankrupt," he said. "It would have a projected shortfall in the hospital trust fund and you would need to make changes to address that shortfall," Oberlander said.

Testosterone Marketing Frenzy Draws Skepticism
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=160834464
The Associated Press
...Welcome to the latest big marketing push by U.S. drug companies. In this case, it's a web page for Abbott Laboratories' Androgel, a billion-dollar selling testosterone gel used by millions of American men struggling with the symptoms of growing older that are associated with low testosterone, such as poor sex drive, weight gain and fatigue. ..."We really 'medicalize' seniors so much that they think the secret always has to be scientific," says Dr. Nortin Hadler of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who has written four books on excessive medical care. "We need another perspective to understand the secrets to healthy aging, which by and large are not pills."

Wary voters sift Medicare claims
http://www.ajc.com/news/news/national-govt-politics/wary-voters-sift-medicare-claims/nR6Ym/
The Atlanta Journal Constitution (Georgia)
...In a March paper in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Marmor and Jonathan Oberlander of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill argued that American policymakers spend too much time searching for the “holy grail” of health reform that will improve quality and reduce costs simultaneously. Reducing costs, they wrote, “does require the U.S. to emulate the lessons of other nations that have been more successful at limiting spending through budgeting, systemwide fee schedules, and concentrated purchasing.”

Acupuncture has limited benefit for chronic pain
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/09/11/acupuncture-has-limited-benefit-for-chronic-pain/
Reuters (Wire Service)
..."I have a long list of chronic pain patients coming to seek acupuncture," said Jongbae Park, head of Asian Medicine & Acupuncture Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. It's usually "not their first approach to address the condition," he said - rather people seek acupuncture when traditional care fails to stop their pain.

Overweight tweens eat fewer calories than peers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/09/10/obesity-teen-calorie.html
CBC News (Canada)
..."One explanation for this would be that increased caloric intake in early childhood is related to obesity's onset, but other mechanisms, such as differences in energy expenditure, may be more responsible for maintaining weight through adolescence," Asheley Cockrell Skinner, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of North Carolina and her colleagues, wrote in Monday's issue of the journal Pediatrics.

Children who are obese at eight find it harder to lose weight when they are teenagers despite eating less than slim peers
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2201360/Children-obese-harder-lose-weight-teenagers-despite-eating-slim-peers.html?openGraphAuthor=%2Fhome%2Fsearch.html%3Fs%3D%26authornamef%3DTamara%2BCohen
The Daily Mail (United Kingdom)
...Researchers from the University of North Carolina say the findings also explains why dieting tends not to work for overweight teenagers and suggest more exercise could help them lose weight. They examined the diet and weight of 12,600 American children aged between one and 17 over several years.

Physical Activity Crucial For Keeping Tweens Healthy
http://www.npr.org/2012/09/10/160899030/physical-activity-crucial-for-keeping-tweens-healthy
"All Things Considered" National Public Radio
...About the only thing getting a workout here are the fingers. It may not seem like a big deal to replace an hour of soccer practice with an hour of video gaming, but small changes in physical activity lead to fewer burned calories. And researcher Ashley Skinner, of the University of North Carolina, was curious. Was this difference alone enough to make a kid overweight? What about the role of diet?
Related Link:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/09/10/160892397/why-heavy-teens-may-eat-less-but-weigh-more-than-their-thinner-peers

Overweight teens don't necessarily consume more calories
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/09/10/overweight-teens-dont-necessarily-consume-more-calories/
Fox News
..."For older children and teenagers, increasing involvement in physical activity may be more important to weight and health than is their child’s diet," said study researcher Asheley Cockrell Skinner, an assistant professor of health policy and pediatrics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "Parents of all children should aim for a healthy diet, but don’t assume that overweight children are eating any worse than their peers," she said.

Some insight into childhood obesity and its costs
http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/blog/2012/09/some-insight-into-childhood-obesity.html
The Triangle Business Journal
Overweight pre-teens don’t consume more calories than their peers, new research has found. The surprising results of a childhood obesity study from UNC-Chapel Hill puts an exclamation point behind advice from pediatricians that parents must instill healthy diet and exercise lifestyles in children at a young age.

Researchers get funding
http://www.heraldsun.com/view/full_story/20099807/article-CAMPUS-BRIEFS
The Herald-Sun (Durham)
Researchers at Duke University and UNC Chapel Hill are among the recipients of major grants from the V Foundation for Cancer Research. Mark Lanasa and Sandeep Dave of the Duke Cancer Institute were selected for their research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at UNC, W. Kimryn Rathmell, Jason Lieb and Ian Davis were selected for their research of renal cell carcinoma.

Overweight tweens eat fewer calories than normal-weight kids: study

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/the-hot-button/overweight-tweens-eat-fewer-calories-than-normal-weight-kids-study/article4536067/?cmpid=rss1
The Globe and Mail (Canada)
...The CBC reports that overeating at younger ages may set the pattern for later years: "One explanation for this would be that increased caloric intake in early childhood is related to obesity's onset, but other mechanisms, such as differences in energy expenditure, may be more responsible for maintaining weight through adolescence," Asheley Cockrell Skinner, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of North Carolina and her colleagues, wrote in Monday's issue of the journal Pediatrics.

Rural clinics help fill in coverage gaps
http://www.wral.com/lifestyles/healthteam/story/11532745/
WRAL-TV (CBS/Raleigh)
...Seeing her this day is Dr. Mimi Miles, a UNC resident physician. UNC Family Medicine is expanding their residency program by bring more physicians here for their training. Dr. Miles was eager to take advantage of it. ...The Cecil Sheps Center for Health Services Research shows that in 2005, of the 408 graduates of the state’s medical schools, only 2 percent were serving in rural communities five years after graduation. "We'll be able to provide probably over 2,000 more patient visits a year for having residents here," said Dr. Evan Ashkin of UNC Family Medicine.

UNC Health To Introduce Teaching Health Center With Piedmont Health
http://chapelboro.com/UNC-Health-To-Introduce-Teaching-Health-Center-Wit/14214363
WCHL-FM (Chapel Hill)
On Wednesday, Piedmont Health and UNC Family Medicine are teaming up to showcase the first teaching health center in the state. UNC Family Medicine Communications and Development Coordinator Donna Parker says the two organizations are jointly collaborating on a new residency program—and this event will be a way to unveil it to the public.

Vaccine development needs a booster shot
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012/09/12/vaccine-development-needs-a-booster-shot/57768356/1
USA Today
...Although multiple studies show that today's vaccines are safe, many parents remain nervous about immunizations, delaying or skipping some of their children's shots -- a trend that has helped to fuel outbreaks of a number of infectious diseases, says Tom Belhorn, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Feeling Full? Blame Microbes: DNews Nugget (Blog)
http://news.discovery.com/human/feeling-full-blame-microbes-dnews-nugget-120913.html
Discovery News
..."If we can understand how specific gut bacteria are able to stimulate absorption of dietary fat, we may be able to use that information to develop new ways to reduce fat absorption in the context of obesity and associated metabolic diseases, and to enhance fat absorption in the context of malnutrition," said study author John Rawls, associate professor in the department of cell and molecular physiology at University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

The Food Fight in Your Gut: Why Bacteria Will Change the Way You Think about Calories (Blog)
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/brainwaves/2012/09/12/the-food-fight-in-your-guts-why-bacteria-will-change-the-way-you-think-about-calories/
Scientific American
...A study published this week adds nuance to scientists’ evolving understanding of how gut bacteria change the way animals digest food. Ivana Semova and John Rawls of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, along with their colleagues, studied the absorption of fluorescent fatty acids in the intestines of tiny translucent zebrafish (Danio rerio).

Four faculty honored with Hettleman awards
http://www.heraldsun.com/view/full_story/20116292/article-Four-faculty-honored-with-Hettleman-awards?
The Herald-Sun (Durham)
Four highly promising professors in diverse fields have been awarded the Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Prizes for Artistic and Scholarly Achievement by Young Faculty. Recipients are Evan S. Dellon, assistant professor of medicine and an adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology in the School of Medicine; Malinda Maynor Lowery, associate professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences; Kimryn Rathmell, associate professor in the departments of medicine and genetics in the School of Medicine; and Yang Yang, associate professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences.

NCSU at core of $18.5M sensor work
http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/print-edition/2012/09/14/ncsu-at-core-of-185m-sensor-work.html
The Triangle Business Journal
...David Peden, project medical director and senior associate dean for translational research at the UNC School of Medicine in Chapel Hill, says the devices are being designed to communicate in real time, possibly sending signals about a person’s health or environment to his or her own smartphone. “We’re hoping this will be a springboard to answer a variety of health questions,” he says.

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