Vital Signs

This week's collection of news and events from the School of Medicine

Researchers Reverse HIV Latency, Important Scientific Step Toward Cure

Researchers Reverse HIV Latency, Important Scientific Step Toward Cure

Overcoming HIV latency – induction of HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant throughout the body – is a major step toward creating a cure for HIV. For the first time, scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill, Emory University, and Qura Therapeutics – a partnership between UNC and ViiV Healthcare – have shown that a new approach can expose latent HIV to attack in two different animal model systems with little or no toxicity.

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Improving Cardiovascular Health of the Most Vulnerable

Improving Cardiovascular Health of the Most Vulnerable

Heart disease and stroke are major causes of pre-mature mortality and morbidity in North Carolina, and there are significant racial and geographic disparities in cardiovascular care, morbidity and mortality. A two-year pilot project led by Rick Stouffer, MD, shows how the cardiovascular health of the most vulnerable patients can be improved with free medications.

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Katrina Donahue, MD, MPH, Appointed to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Katrina Donahue, MD, MPH, Appointed to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

UNC Department of Family Medicine professor and vice chair of research, Katrina Donahue MD, MPH, has been appointed to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force as one of its newest members.

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Remembering Dr. Jeffrey Houpt

Remembering Dr. Jeffrey Houpt

Jeffrey L. Houpt, MD, Dean Emeritus of the UNC School of Medicine, and former CEO of UNC Health Care, passed away on January 13 at the age of 78.

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Researchers find clues to drug resistance in medulloblastoma subtype

Researchers find clues to drug resistance in medulloblastoma subtype

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers led by Timothy Gershon, MD, PhD, and Kirk Wilhelmsen, MD, PhD, have new evidence to explain how drug resistance develops in a major subtype of medulloblastoma, the most common invasive brain tumor in children.

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