Ting honored with University Award for the Advancement of Women

Jenny Ting, William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, co-director of the Inflammatory Diseases Institute and program leader at Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, received a University Award for the Advancement of Women.

Dr. Ting was one of three people to receive the University Awards for the Advancement of Women on March 21 at the Campus Y in honor of their dedication to the empowerment of women.

The awards, created in 2006, honor individuals who have mentored or supported women on campus, elevated the status of women or improved campus policies for them, promoted women’s recruitment and retention, or promoted professional development for women.

The three winners – one faculty member, one staff member and one student, graduate student or postdoctoral scholar are eligible – receive a monetary award ($5,000 for the faculty and staff winners, $2,500 for the student scholar).

This year’s honorees are Camille McGirt, a senior majoring in health policy and management in the Gillings School of Global Public Health; Kelli Raker, rape prevention coordinator at Campus Health Services; and Jenny Ting, William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, co-director of the Inflammatory Diseases Institute and program leader at Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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Among the more than 85 graduate students, postdoctoral scholars and clinician scientists trained by Ting, many have become career scientists.

“Women mentored by Jenny Ting find themselves lifted and supported to the place where they thrive as professors in colleges, researchers in the pharmaceutical and biotech industry, and staffers in scientific public policy,” a nominator said.

Ting, an internationally recognized leader in her field, has been called the medical school’s “go-to” person in providing career advice for women. Not only did she advocate successfully for a formal maternity leave policy in the school, a nominator said, she also has applied a portion of grant funding toward maternity leave for a number of the women she mentored.

“She has quietly, but very effectively, worked within the School of Medicine to ensure the retention of numerous talented women faculty,” a colleague said. Another praised Ting for mentoring trainees long after they leave her lab.

The original article was published by the University Gazette here.