UNC Family Medicine discovers dramatic shift in attitude towards teen smoking

UNC Family Medicine’s nationally known Tobacco Prevention and Evaluation Program releases an article that suggests teenagers want to eliminate smoking in all indoor and outdoor places.

Chapel Hill, NC - North Carolina, a tobacco-growing state, does a lot to protect smoking: Its cigarette taxes are nearly the lowest in the country, and it only banned smoking in most restaurants, bars and hotels in 2010. Still, the results show that "it's very clear that teens and youth want to eliminate smoking in indoor and outdoor places," said study co-author Leah Ranney, associate director at UNC Family Medicine's Tobacco Prevention and Evaluation Program.

More than 80 percent of 3,805 North Carolina middle-school students and more than 70 percent of 3,000 high-school students surveyed said smoking should not be allowed at home, indoors at work, or in cars.  This was true whether the teens were smokers or non-smokers.  "It is undeniably clear that teens and youth want to eliminate smoking in indoor and outdoor places and it is our obligation as adults to protect them. We believe, in fact, that the failure to act now is a form of child abuse," notes Ranney.

The Study was published this week in U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

 

Media Contact:  Donna Parker 919-843-4760 or donna_parker@med.unc.edu

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