New funding will support STD research training in South China

The Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases will receive about $1 million over five years from the NIH Fogarty International Center.

New funding will support STD research training in South China click to enlarge Chinese clinicians and researchers pack the room for a training session of the UNC-South China STD Research Training Center in Guangzhou. Photo by Paul Godley.

September 13, 2013 — The Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health’s Fogarty International Center to support the UNC-South China STD Research Training Center.

Syphilis has become the most commonly reported communicable disease in most major cities of South China, the strongest indicator of the resurgence of STDs all over the country. The region is experiencing massive rural-to-urban migration and poverty, which is fueling the spread.

Training at the center will focus on classical STDs—syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV, human papillomavirus—as well as hepatitis B and C. The center brings together medicine, public health, implementation science, social science, and policy experts not only to improve research capacity, but also to address the broader policy and development issues that must be part of any successful US-China collaboration.

The project is led by Myron Cohen, director of the Institute of Global Health & Infectious Diseases, and Joseph Tucker, MD, assistant professor of medicine and director of UNC-Project-China.

The award is one of six new Fogarty Center grants, totaling $5.6 million, to support new and ongoing infectious disease research training in five low- and middle-income countries. Funding from Fogarty’s Global Infectious Disease Research Training program will enhance the efforts of grantees to build human capacity and conduct research on diseases that are endemic in their home countries. The five-year awards fund new and ongoing projects in Bangladesh, China, Ethiopia, Kenya and Pakistan.