Willis a co-author on American Heart Association scientific statement

UNC McAllister Heart Institute member Monte Willis, MD, is a co-author of a scientific statement from the American Heart Association regarding the burden of heart disease among African Americans. Heart disease is the leading killer of all Americans, but in African Americans, heart disease develops earlier, and deaths from heart disease are higher than in Caucasian Americans.

The average lifespan of African Americans is significantly shorter than Caucasian Americans, mostly because of heart disease and stroke, which contributed to more than two million years of life lost among African Americans between 1999 and 2010, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Heart disease is the leading killer of all Americans, but in African Americans, heart disease develops earlier, and deaths from heart disease are higher than in Caucasian Americans. In recent years, the life expectancy of African Americans was 3.4 years shorter than that of Caucasians (75.5 vs. 78.9 years, respectively), largely attributable to having a higher rate of heart attacks, sudden cardiac arrest, heart failure and strokes than Caucasian Americans.

Read the full statement.

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