NIH awards Meyer second grant to study arterial stiffness and brain health

Michelle Meyer, PhD, MPH, assistant professor in the department of emergency medicine, was awarded a $2.3 million grant to investigate the association of central arterial stiffening with structural changes in the brain, reduced cognitive function, and Alzheimer’s disease-associated dementias in over 2,700 participants in the Jackson Heart Study, an ongoing cohort study of African Americans in Jackson, Mississippi.

NIH awards Meyer second grant to study arterial stiffness and brain health click to enlarge Michelle Meyer, PhD, MPH

This will be the first study to contribute information on the association of central arterial stiffness and brain structure and function in a large sample of African Americans, a high-risk population for hypertension and dementia. Understanding how arterial stiffness influences brain health has potential to identify arterial stiffness as a modifiable risk factor for cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease and related dementias that may lead to prevention strategies. Collaborators on the R01 include Drs. Gerardo Heiss (department of epidemiology) and Matthew Loop (department of biostatistics). NIH recently awarded Dr. Meyer a $3 million R01 grant to investigate these associations in a large U.S. Hispanic/Latino population. Collectively, these studies will provide insight into the association of arterial stiffness and brain health in racially/ethnically diverse populations.

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