Vital Signs

This week's collection of news and events from the School of Medicine

A Gene’s Journey from Covert to Celebrated

A Gene’s Journey from Covert to Celebrated

Unmasking a previously misunderstood gene, University of North Carolina scientists discover an unlikely potential drug target for gastrointestinal cancers.

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Another molecular clue in the mysterious influence of microbiota in the gut

By focusing on small molecules called microRNAs in stem cells of the intestine, UNC School of Medicine researchers have proposed a new mechanism by which gut microbes might help keep us healthy or make us sick.

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Are you ready to explore baby’s genome?

Are you ready to explore baby’s genome?

UNC clinical geneticists are part of a national consortium of researchers studying the ins and outs of genome sequencing for newborn health screenings and beyond.

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Are prebiotics the answer for lactose intolerance?

Are prebiotics the answer for lactose intolerance?

New research led by scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and NC State University demonstrates the effectiveness of using prebiotics to change the composition of the gut microbiome of those suffering from lactose intolerance.

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Cost, technology issues are barriers to real-time cancer patient symptom reporting

Cost, technology issues are barriers to real-time cancer patient symptom reporting

In a perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Ethan Basch, MD, MSc, professor of medicine and director of UNC Lineberger’s Cancer Outcomes Research Program, addressed the need for – and the barriers preventing – electronic reporting of patients’ symptoms between visits.

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Optogenetics Breakthrough: UNC scientists expand the use of light to control protein activity in cells

Optogenetics Breakthrough: UNC scientists expand the use of light to control protein activity in cells

The new research technique, developed by researchers at the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, has the potential to illuminate the roles of previously inaccessible proteins important for health and disease.

Optogenetics Breakthrough: UNC scientists expand the use of light to control protein activity in cells - Read More…

Should biomedical graduate schools ignore the GRE?

Should biomedical graduate schools ignore the GRE?

UNC research shows test scores don’t forecast productivity or success in graduate programs within the experimental sciences.

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New study identifies most important factors in aesthetic surgery patient decisions

New study identifies most important factors in aesthetic surgery patient decisions

UNC School of Medicine researchers, led by Cindy Wu, MD, used a crowdsourcing model to identify what potential patients value most when seeking an aesthetic surgeon.

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The science of baby’s first sight

The science of baby’s first sight

UNC scientists conduct seminal experiments to unveil how early-in-life visual experiences – simply trying to see – sculpt a particular subnetwork of brain circuitry we need in order to see properly.

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Start-up with UNC ties secures $2.9 million to develop blood test for cancer

Start-up with UNC ties secures $2.9 million to develop blood test for cancer

A start-up company co-founded by UNC Lineberger researcher Andrew Wang has raised $2.9 million to commercialize a test designed to capture cancer cells circulating in the blood.

Start-up with UNC ties secures $2.9 million to develop blood test for cancer - Read More…

Helping solve a health care shortage

Helping solve a health care shortage

Less than a year after she earned her degree from UNC, Misty Cox is already putting her skills to work — and helping make North Carolinians healthier in the process. Cox, a 2016 UNC-Chapel Hill graduate, is one of 13 fellows participating in MedServe, a program focused on helping solve the problem of health care shortages across North Carolina. The program was co-founded by Patrick O'Shea, a UNC School of Medicine Student.

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