Search results

191 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
From the Gazette: Lee advocates treating the whole patient, not just the injury
When your father is a surgeon and your mother is an internist, odds are that you will be a medical professional, too. The only real question is what your specialty will be. Michael Lee chose physiatry, also known as physical medicine and rehabilitation – and a very new field 30 years ago. He knew that was what he wanted to do in high school, when he had a summer job transporting patients at Oak Forest Hospital in Illinois.
Located in Vital Signs / 2014 / Nov. 20
SECURE-IBD Provides Answers During Uncertain Times
The SECURE-IBD (Surveillance Epidemiology of Coronavirus Under Research Exclusion for Inflammatory Bowel Disease) database was designed by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Mount Sinai to answer questions that patients with IBD and their caregivers might have during these uncertain times. Written by Marla Broadfoot
Located in Vital Signs / 2020 / July 2
King Steps in as New Chief of the Burn Surgery Division
Booker T. King, MD, joins the Department of surgery as Chief and Professor, in the Division of Burn Surgery and the Director of the NC Jaycee Burn Center. He sat down to discuss what inspired him to become a doctor, the contributions he has made to science to help burn patients, and his goal to help the burn center be the best academic burn center in the country.
Located in Vital Signs / 2020 / March 19
A conversation with Sarah Smithson: Course Director, Advanced Practice Selective
Sarah Smithson, MD, MPH, has had a busy summer. In addition to recently transitioning into full-time practice with the Department of Medicine’s Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Smithson was named course director for the UNC School of Medicine’s Advance Practice Selective, beginning the new roles July 1. We spoke with Smithson about her background and what she hopes to achieve in her new role.
Located in Vital Signs / 2015 / Aug. 6
In 1975, UNC Lineberger was named a ‘Designated Cancer Center’ by the National Cancer Institute. To mark the milestone, UNC Lineberger's leadership, past and current, recently got together to reflect on the Center's history and look forward to the future.
Located in Vital Signs / 2016 / July 21
Creating Future Scientists
Albert Schweitzer Fellows and second-year medical students William Runge and Ricky Singh have taken their love of science to middle school classrooms in Hillsborough, N.C., hoping to foster and develop interest in the sciences among young students.
Located in Vital Signs / 2015 / Feb. 19
Hanvey helps communities and families in need
First-year medical student Blaire Hanvey was recently honored with the June C. Allcott Fellowship in Medicine and the Zollicoffer-Cross Community Health Fellowship.
Located in Vital Signs / 2014 / March 6
Saira Sheikh and Patty Spears featured speakers at the National Academy of Sciences Health Literacy in Clinical Trials workshop
Saira Sheikh, MD, of the UNC Thurston Arthritis Research Center (TARC), and Patty Spears of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center were invited by the National Academy of Sciences Roundtable on Health Literacy to discuss their respective contributions related to education, awareness and health literacy in clinical trials, at the Health Literacy in Clinical Trials Workshop: Practice and Impact on April 11, 2019 in Washington D.C.
Located in Vital Signs / 2019 / April 18
Walk for Health Equity
UNC Health sponsored walks for Health Equity in support of Black Lives Matter on Tuesday at multiple locations, including UNC Medical Center, Hillsborough, UNC REX, UNC Wakebrook and across UNCPN. Hundreds of co-workers gathered to demonstrate their stand against racism and in support of health equity. Each event included a moment of silence.
Located in Vital Signs / 2020 / June 25
Class of 2018 immersed in first year of TEC curriculum
Prompted by a rapidly changing health care environment, the Translational Education at Carolina (TEC) curriculum was developed to provide a more student-centered and patient based way of learning that facilitates translation and integration of basic, clinical, and population science to enhance human health and well-being.
Located in Vital Signs / 2014 / Oct. 16