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Researchers implicate gene in DNA errors in aggressive breast cancer
Researchers led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Gaorav Gupta, MD, PhD, described the role of a mutation in the Mre11 gene in triple negative breast cancer and how a disruption of Mre11 function plays a significant role in the genomic instability of that cancer type.
Located in News / 2020 / February
Key Molecular Machine in Cells Pictured in Detail for the First Time
Histone mRNA-cleaving machine, crucial for healthy cell division, yields up its secrets after almost half a century of research. Zbigniew Dominski, PhD, and William Marzluff, PhD, led this effort at the UNC School of Medicine, along with key collaborators at Columbia University and Rockefeller University.
Located in News / 2020 / February
Life’s Clockwork: Scientist Shows How Molecular Engines Keep Us Ticking
Charles Carter, PhD, published seminal work on the inner workings of chemical machines inside our cells that turn energy into action, the foundation of life.
Located in News / 2020 / January
Scientists Visualize Competition Between Healthy, Dysfunctional Platelets
In some patients with blood disorders, platelet transfusion therapy doesn’t work. UNC School of Medicine scientists used real-time imaging and mouse models to show why. Their work, led by Wolfgang Bergmeier, PhD, could guide clinical studies and better use of platelet therapy.
Located in News / 2019 / December
How Enzymes Reign Supreme in Worldwide Carbon Recycling
Richard Wolfenden, PhD, professor of biochemistry and biophysics, details how white rot fungi produce enzymes that turn out to be key players in the carbon cycle.
Located in News / 2019 / December
Machine Learning Helps Scientists Measure Important Inflammation Process
Led by the UNC School of Medicine lab of Leslie Parise, PhD, researchers created an artificial intelligence tool to measure NETosis, an important inflammatory process by which certain white blood cells trap invaders like bacteria. This work will help scientists find ways to stop or promote the process in disease states.
Located in News / 2019 / December
UNC Chromatin and Epigenetics Certificate Program launched
The UNC Graduate School as announced a certificate program in Chromatin and Epigenetics available to all students working on their PhD. This effort was spearheaded by Brian Strahl, PhD, professor and vice chair in the UNC Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
Located in Vital Signs / 2019 / November 26
Feast or Famine: Scientists Find Key Bio ‘Switch’ that Helps Cells Adapt
From the UNC School of Medicine lab of Brian Strahl, PhD, and Stanford University lab of Ashby Morrison, PhD, comes a solution to the mystery of “crotonyl” marks in the genome that may have relevance for the treatment of various forms of cancer.
Located in News / 2019 / November
Scientists Visualize Competition Between Healthy, Dysfunctional Platelets
In some patients with blood disorders, platelet transfusion therapy doesn’t work. UNC School of Medicine scientists used real-time imaging and mouse models to show why. Their work could guide clinical studies and better use of platelet therapy.
Located in Biochemistry and Biophysics News / December 2019 / News
Surprise Finding About HIV Reservoir Could Lead to Better Therapies
Researchers led by Ron Swanstrom, PhD, and colleagues in South Africa, discovered that the latent HIV reservoir that persists during antiretroviral treatment mostly reflects viruses present in the blood at the start of antiretroviral treatment.
Located in News / 2019 / October