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Bronze Stars, White Coat
As a student in the UNC School of Medicine's Physician Assistant Program, two-time Bronze Star Award recipient Curtis Carr is building on the medical skills he acquired as a Green Beret medic serving in Afghanistan. He looks forward to applying these skills in the civilian world next year.
Located in News / 2017 / March
The Quiet Professional
Retired Green Beret medic Todd Williams earned three Bronze Stars and two Defense Meritorious Service Medals, among other service recognitions, during his distinguished 28-year military career. Today, he helps lead nontraditional students, including military veterans with medical experience, on a path toward becoming physician assistants through the UNC School of Medicine’s recently launched Physician Assistant Program.
Located in News / 2016 / June
Classroom to Clinic: First-years in the Field
The UNC School of Medicine's Clinical Week pulls medical students out of the classroom and sends them to communities across North Carolina to gain medical knowledge and develop clinical skills through interaction with primary care physicians and their patients. Last week, the UNC SOM Facebook page captured the Clinical Week experiences of first-year medical students. Please take a moment to see where our students went and to read what they learned, as shared in their words. And if you haven't already done so, "Like" the UNC School of Medicine on Facebook.
Located in Vital Signs / 2016 / March 17
Green Beret, White Coat
Whether donning a green hat or a white coat, Karl Holt has lived with a service mindset. As a Green Beret medic, he saved the lives of others during a helicopter crash in Afghanistan in 2009. He nearly lost his life that night, and spent years recovering from his injuries, both physical and psychological. Today, he is on his way to becoming a physician, and hopes that his experiences will help other veterans as they transition into civilian life.
Located in News / 2015 / December
Medical operations at Operation Toy Drop led by UNC's Siler
Earlier this month, Sean Siler, DO, MBA, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine at the UNC School of Medicine and Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves, led medical operations at the annual Operation Toy Drop at Fort Bragg, an event that trains paratroopers and benefits children in need.
Located in News / 2015 / December
A Servant's Heart: Honoring Fallen Heroes
Capt. Jason Jones lost his life in Afghanistan in 2014. His wife, UNC pediatrics resident Dr. Amy Jones, has since become an active member of Special Ops Survivors, a group that supports the spouses of fallen heroes. On Dec. 6, Dr. Jones and members of the Military Medicine Interest Group at UNC were honored at halftime of the UNC men's basketball game against Davidson. Watch video of the ceremony, along with a video produced by UNC athletics.
Located in News / 2015 / December
Serving the Underserved in Honduras
Summer 2015 marked the twelfth annual community health clinic led by the Honduran Health Alliance, a UNC School of Medicine student-led group that provides critical health services for Honduran women, clinical education for UNC medical learners, and experiences that inform the careers of future doctors.
Located in Vital Signs / 2015 / Oct. 15
Helping Veterans, Sending Care Across North Carolina
On September 24, individuals and leaders gathered to celebrate the new UNC Physician Assistant Program, which is set to launch on January 4, 2016, with its first class of 20 students. The program will provide educational and career development opportunities for nontraditional students, including veterans with medical experience, while reducing North Carolina's health-care workforce shortage in underserved areas.
Located in News / 2015 / October
Supported Service
For more than three decades, pediatric respiratory therapist Mark Hall served in the Army National Guard. He deployed all over the world and was mobilized to places on short notice. Thanks to the support he received at UNC Hospitals, his transitions were always seamless.
Located in News / 2015 / September
A Good Heart
High school dropout, Green Beret medic who served three tours in Iraq, Special Forces medic instructor at Fort Bragg, lymphoma fighter who is free of cancer today, and future physician and researcher -- the remarkable path to medicine of rising third-year UNC medical student Eric Strand.
Located in News / 2015 / June