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UNC researchers identify seventh and eighth bases of DNA
For decades, scientists have known that DNA consists of four basic units -- adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine. In recent history, scientists have expanded that list from four to six. Now researchers from the UNC School of Medicine have discovered the seventh and eighth bases of DNA.
Located in News / 2011 / July
Channing Der and Yue Xiong receive 2011 Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award
The Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award, established in 2007 by the Battle Foundation of Rocky Mount, recognizes exceptional cancer research at the UNC School of Medicine and comes with a $25,000 prize for each awardee.
Located in News / 2011 / July
Parise elected as Public Affairs Advisory Committee Member of ASBMB
Leslie Parise, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, has been elected serve on the Public Affairs Advisory Committee, which is a standing committee of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB).
Located in Vital Signs / 2011 / June 2
Tet further revealed! Studies track protein relevant to stem cells, cancer
UNC biochemist Yi Zhang, PhD, whose team conducted the studies, called the findings an important step in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind cell differentiation and the development of cancer.
Located in News / 2011 / March
Molecular battle in cancer cells offers clues for treatment
Researchers investigating a genetic mutation in brain cancer and leukemia patients have discovered how one cancer metabolite battles another normal metabolite to contribute cancer development.
Located in News / 2011 / January
UNC scientists pinpoint link between light signal and circadian rhythms
A new paper by Aziz Sancar, MD, PhD and his colleagues takes an important step in understanding the underlying molecular signals that influence a broad array of biological processes ranging from the sleep-wake cycle to cancer growth and development.
Located in News / 2010 / December
Tools used to decipher 'histone code' may be faulty
Recent research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found a number of issues with histone antibodies, the main tools used to decipher this code, suggesting they may need more rigorous testing.
Located in News / 2010 / December
Heat helped hasten life's beginnings
New research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill investigating the effect of temperature on extremely slow chemical reactions suggests that the time required for evolution on a warm earth is shorter than critics might expect.
Located in News / 2010 / December