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UNC researchers decode structure of an entire HIV genome
The structure of an entire HIV genome has been decoded for the first time by researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill. The results have widespread implications for understanding the strategies that viruses, like the one that causes AIDS, use to infect humans.
Located in Vital Signs / 2009 / Vital Signs - August 7, 2009
UNC study will test therapies to eradicate HIV infection—medicine’s holy grail
Researchers from the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases have received $2.7 million from the National Institutes of Health to develop and test new therapeutic agents that may eradicate HIV infection.
Located in Vital Signs / Archives / Vital Signs - Sept. 11, 2009
UNC to Test Therapeutic Vaccine in People Living with HIV
A multidisciplinary research team at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been awarded more than $5.6 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to test a therapeutic vaccine in people living with HIV.
Located in Vital Signs / 2017 / July 27
Surprise Finding About HIV Reservoir Could Lead to Better Therapies
Researchers led by Ron Swanstrom, PhD, and colleagues in South Africa, discovered that the latent HIV reservoir that persists during antiretroviral treatment mostly reflects viruses present in the blood at the start of antiretroviral treatment.
Located in News / 2019 / October
T cells alone are sufficient to establish and maintain HIV infection in the brain
Led by J. Victor Garcia, PhD, UNC researchers report in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that T cells in the brain may be an important HIV reservoir that should be targeted by HIV cure approaches.
Located in News / 2018 / June
Long-acting injectable implant shows promise for HIV treatment and prevention
The long-acting antiretroviral drug formulation, developed by UNC School of Medicine researchers Rahima Benhabbour, PhD and Martina Kovarova, PhD, is injected under the skin and forms into a solid implant that dissolves slowly to release anti-HIV medication over time.
Located in News / 2018 / October
UNC Study Advances the Ability to Expose Latent HIV
UNC researchers led by Nancie Archin, PhD, and David Margolis, MD, have shown that interval dosing of the drug Vorinostat reverses HIV latency and is well-tolerated in people living with HIV. However, while Vorinostat makes latent HIV easier to detect, it does not clear or deplete infection, meaning additional advances will be needed to achieve a cure. These results were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation on July 17.
Located in News / 2017 / July
UNC School of Medicine Researchers Prove HIV Targets Tissue Macrophages
Findings contradict previous studies questioning the relevance of these cells
Located in News / 2016 / March
HIV Treatment Keeps Uninfected Partner from Contracting the Virus
Anti-HIV medications suppress the viral load of people living with HIV and provide durable protection against heterosexual transmission according to the groundbreaking study led by Myron Cohen, MD.
Located in News / 2016 / July
Researchers Discuss Challenges, Successes of HIV Cure Research in Science
A better understanding of HIV latency is the key to eradicating the virus researchers at the University of North Carolina and partner institutions write in a perspective in the journal Science.
Located in News / 2016 / July