Genetics

The latest genetics news from UNC Health Care and the UNC School of Medicine.

Magnuson elected vice-president and future president of Genetics Society of America

Magnuson elected vice-president and future president of Genetics Society of America

Terry Magnuson, PhD, Sarah Graham Kenan Professor in the Department of Genetics and Vice Chancellor for Research at UNC-Chapel Hill, has been elected 2018 vice president and 2019 president of the Genetics Society of America. Magnuson has previously served GSA as a member of the Board of Directors and as both an Associate and Senior Editor of the GSA journal GENETICS

Magnuson elected vice-president and future president of Genetics Society of America - Read More…

Gut bacteria bolster disease research in labs

Gut bacteria bolster disease research in labs

In the journal Cell, researchers at UNC, NIH, and Baylor show how gut bacteria from wild mice is likely very important for the accurate modeling of human diseases in the lab.

Gut bacteria bolster disease research in labs - Read More…

Timing could matter to how responsive cancer cells are to treatment, study suggests

Timing could matter to how responsive cancer cells are to treatment, study suggests

In a new study published in Cell Systems, UNC Lineberger's Jeremy Purvis, PhD, and colleagues report that the timing of when DNA damage occurs within these different checkpoints matters to a cell’s fate.

Timing could matter to how responsive cancer cells are to treatment, study suggests - Read More…

Powell appointed to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children

Powell appointed to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children

Cynthia Powell, MD, professor of pediatrics and genetics, has been appointed to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children.

Powell appointed to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children - Read More…

Scientists find gene linked to heightened mucus levels in lung disease

Scientists find gene linked to heightened mucus levels in lung disease

In lab experiments, UNC School of Medicine researchers showed that blocking the gene Bpifb1 led to a striking increase in the mucin protein MUC5B in mucus.

Scientists find gene linked to heightened mucus levels in lung disease - Read More…

Thanks to a UNC research project, she can walk again

Thanks to a UNC research project, she can walk again

As UNC geneticist Jonathan Berg gears up to lead a $9.7-million renewal of the NCGENES project, we look at a story from the original study and how it changed the fortunes of a woman from Goldsboro, NC.

Thanks to a UNC research project, she can walk again - Read More…

Journal Edited by UNC Researcher Reaches Record High Impact Factor

Journal Edited by UNC Researcher Reaches Record High Impact Factor

ACMG's Genetics in Medicine journal receives record high impact factor, is now in top 2.5 percent of all indexed journals.

Journal Edited by UNC Researcher Reaches Record High Impact Factor - Read More…

Newly designed viral vectors could lead to improved gene therapies

Newly designed viral vectors could lead to improved gene therapies

UNC and University of Florida researchers created viruses to deliver gene therapies while evading pre-existing immune system responses. Aravind Asokan, PhD, led the research team at UNC.

Newly designed viral vectors could lead to improved gene therapies - Read More…

Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organization

Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organization

UNC study uncovers crucial function of a yeast enzyme Set2 whose well-conserved human counterpart is often mutated in cancers, especially kidney cancer.

Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organization - Read More…

Taking stock of the Collaborative Cross

Taking stock of the Collaborative Cross

Five years ago, the journals Genetics and G3 published a series of papers that reported the first data from the genetic resource population known as the Collaborative Cross. This week, two journals release special issues highlighting the breadth of work this tool has made possible.

Taking stock of the Collaborative Cross - Read More…

In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything

In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything

UNC scientists show how DNA is accessed and used during the journey to maturation in fruit flies, and what this might mean to our understanding of how cancers arise.

In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything - Read More…

UNC's Jonathan Berg featured on ABC 11 TV

UNC's Jonathan Berg featured on ABC 11 TV

Watch UNC geneticist Jonathan Berg, MD, PhD, consult with ABC 11 TV reporter Tisha Powell about results from a direct-to-consumer genetics analysis.

UNC's Jonathan Berg featured on ABC 11 TV - Read More…

For anorexia nervosa, researchers implicate genetic locus on chromosome 12

For anorexia nervosa, researchers implicate genetic locus on chromosome 12

UNC researchers led the most powerful genomic study of anorexia nervosa conducted to date to identify the common roots anorexia shares with psychiatric and metabolic traits. Cynthia Bulik, PhD, FAED, was the study's lead investigator.

For anorexia nervosa, researchers implicate genetic locus on chromosome 12 - Read More…

Collaboration offers genetic testing for NC newborns

Collaboration offers genetic testing for NC newborns

A new NIH-funded consortium in North Carolina will offer Early Check, a free newborn screening done in partnership with the N.C. State Laboratory of Public Health, UNC, Duke University, and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Collaboration offers genetic testing for NC newborns - Read More…

Another molecular clue in the mysterious influence of microbiota in the gut

By focusing on small molecules called microRNAs in stem cells of the intestine, UNC School of Medicine researchers have proposed a new mechanism by which gut microbes might help keep us healthy or make us sick.

Another molecular clue in the mysterious influence of microbiota in the gut - Read More…

Are you ready to explore baby’s genome?

Are you ready to explore baby’s genome?

UNC clinical geneticists are part of a national consortium of researchers studying the ins and outs of genome sequencing for newborn health screenings and beyond.

Are you ready to explore baby’s genome? - Read More…

Search Committee Seeks Chair, Department of Genetics

A search committee has been established to identify a well-qualified leader for the UNC School of Medicine's Department of Genetics.

Search Committee Seeks Chair, Department of Genetics - Read More…

Researchers find two distinct genetic subtypes in Crohn’s disease patients

Researchers find two distinct genetic subtypes in Crohn’s disease patients

The UNC School of Medicine discovery could lead to more effective, personalized treatments for the debilitating gastrointestinal condition.

Researchers find two distinct genetic subtypes in Crohn’s disease patients - Read More…

UNC’s Purvis earns NIH Director’s New Innovator Award

UNC’s Purvis earns NIH Director’s New Innovator Award

With a focus on stem cells, Jeremy Purvis, PhD, wants to tap the power of computer modeling to develop regenerative medicine solutions to medical conditions.

UNC’s Purvis earns NIH Director’s New Innovator Award - Read More…

Komen recognizes Charles Perou with the Brinker Award, its top scientific honor

Komen recognizes Charles Perou with the Brinker Award, its top scientific honor

Susan G. Komen announced UNC Lineberger researcher Charles M. Perou, PhD, as the recipient of this year's Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Basic Science for his contributions to the understanding of breast cancer as distinct molecular subtypes that have prognostic value using cutting-edge cancer genomics tools.

Komen recognizes Charles Perou with the Brinker Award, its top scientific honor - Read More…

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