Search results

1413 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
New Study Finds the Use of Multiple Tobacco Products Is Popular Among Teenagers
UNC Tobacco Prevention and Evaluation Program finds poly-tobacco use among teenagers is on the rise.
Located in Vital Signs / 2015 / Dec. 10
Noninvasive prenatal screening tests may detect underlying maternal conditions, including cancer, in the mother, according to a study published July 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association on which Dr. Neeta Vora, a clinical geneticist and assistant professor of maternal-fetal medicine at UNC's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, is co-author.
Located in Vital Signs / 2015 / July 16
The Signal and the Noise
Henrik Dohlman, PhD, discovered why seemingly identical cells might react differently to the chemical signals inside our bodies and the drugs we use to battle diseases.
Located in News / 2014 / July
UNC clinical trials play crucial role in FDA approval for diabetes drug
Led by John Buse, MD, PhD, director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center, the clinical research of UNC doctors and the participation of thousands of patients culminates in a new, effective, and safe daily injectable drug to combat type-2 diabetes.
Located in News / 2016 / November
UNC’s de Silva leads expert panel on Zika research, response
Seventy-five percent of people infected with Zika don’t show any symptoms. An expert panel at RTI International delved into the issues surrounding the virus, including the lack of diagnostic tools.
Located in News / 2016 / June
Predicting Autism: Study Links Infant Brain Connections to Diagnoses at Age 2
In two previous studies, University of North Carolina researchers and colleagues linked infant brain anatomy differences to autism diagnoses at age two. Now they show differences in functional connections between brain regions at 6 months to predict autism at age two.
Located in News / 2017 / June
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society awards grant to Savoldo for immunotherapy research
A grant from The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society will help fund clinical research led by UNC Lineberger's Barbara Savoldo, MD, PhD, into an investigational chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia that would include a built-in "safety switch."
Located in News / 2017 / November
Pairing cancer genomics with cognitive computing highlights potential therapeutic options
Study findings suggest that cognitive computing could help physicians to stay abreast of an ever-expanding body of scientific literature as well as highlight potential cancer therapeutic options. UNC Lineberger's William Kim, MD, is the study's corresponding author.
Located in News / 2017 / November
Would you eat that doughnut if you knew you had to walk two miles to burn it off?
The National Institutes of Health recently awarded researchers from the UNC School of Medicine and the UNC Gillings School of Public Health more than $2 million to study the effects of physical activity food labeling on consumer food choices and exercise.
Located in News / 2014 / October
Researchers create DNA-based ‘nano-cocoons’ to attack and kill cancer cells
In cell lines, scientists at the joint UNC-NC State biomedical engineering program have shown that the new nano particles can stealthily enter cancer cells and release a known drug to attack tumors from the inside.
Located in News / 2014 / October