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UNC scientists pinpoint how a single genetic mutation increases autism risk
The research shows the precise cellular mechanisms that could increase risk for the disorder and how an existing drug might help thousands of people with autism.
Located in News / 2015 / August
Scientists identify gene vital for rebuilding intestine after cancer treatment
Protecting the gastrointestinal system during chemotherapy or radiation could allow patients to tolerate more aggressive treatments to attack tumors.
Located in News / 2015 / August
Put that in your e-cigarette and smoke it, or should you?
UNC researcher Ilona Jaspers, PhD, to present her findings on the potential effects of e-cigarettes
Located in News / 2016 / February
Research shows acupuncture could offer relief for patients with esophageal disorders
Preliminary research led by Marco Patti, MD, professor of surgery, and collaborators in Brazil, has shown that acupuncture could offer relief for patients suffering from swallowing disorders such as achalasia.
Located in Vital Signs / 2017 / Aug. 3
In all U.S. regions, broad support for increasing legal age of tobacco sales
Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and East Carolina University report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that in all nine regions of the country, a majority of adults supported increasing the minimum legal age for tobacco product sales. They also found the most support for increasing the minimum age to 21 rather than to 20 or 19.
Located in News / 2016 / May
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute awards funding to address research priorities in health care for women with diabetes
Wanda Nicholson, MD, MPH, MBA, director of the Diabetes and Obesity Core at the UNC Center for Women’s Health Research and member of the UNC Diabetes Center, will partner with Wendy Bennett, MD, MPH, of Johns Hopkins University, to create an online network to engage women with diabetes.
Located in Vital Signs / 2016 / June 2
How blood vessels control their destiny
UNC researchers define the importance of the decoy receptor VEGFR1 in the process of angiogenesis, in findings that could have important implications in the treatment of cancer and other diseases.
Located in News / 2017 / June
UNC study: Mast cell tryptase test may aid in diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis
A pathology test may help doctors distinguish between two separate but overlapping esophageal disorders that require different courses of treatment, according to a study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Located in News / 2010 / May
UNC Lineberger Research Provides New Insights Into Deadly Brain Cancer
New findings by researchers at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center suggest that the most common form of malignant brain cancer in adults, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is probably not a single disease but a set of diseases, each with a distinct underlying molecular disease process.
Located in Vital Signs / Archives / Vital Signs - Jan. 21, 2010
P Rex-1 protein key to melanoma metastasis
Researchers from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center are part of a team that has identified a protein, called P-Rex1, that is key to the movement of cells called melanoblasts. When these cells experience uncontrolled growth, melanoma develops.
Located in News / 2011 / November