Cancer

The latest cancer news from UNC Health Care and the UNC School of Medicine.

Parents ranked cancer prevention as No. 1 provider reason for HPV vaccination

Parents ranked cancer prevention as No. 1 provider reason for HPV vaccination

A survey led by UNC Lineberger's Melissa Gilkey, PhD, and collaborators found that parents ranked cancer prevention as the most compelling reason health care providers can give for recommending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

Parents ranked cancer prevention as No. 1 provider reason for HPV vaccination - Read More…

UNC Lineberger among national leaders endorsing goal of eliminating HPV-related cancers in the US

UNC Lineberger among national leaders endorsing goal of eliminating HPV-related cancers in the US

The directors of the 70 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers, including UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, have issued a joint statement endorsing gender-neutral HPV vaccination and evidence-based cancer screening.

UNC Lineberger among national leaders endorsing goal of eliminating HPV-related cancers in the US - Read More…

More frequent screening after prostate cancer treatment not linked to improved survival

More frequent screening after prostate cancer treatment not linked to improved survival

A study by UNC Lineberger's Ronald Chen, MD, MPH, and colleagues assessed whether monitoring prostate cancer patients following treatment with a PSA test every three months versus once a year would provide a long-term survival benefit.

More frequent screening after prostate cancer treatment not linked to improved survival - Read More…

Blood mutations could contaminate genetic analyses of tumors

Blood mutations could contaminate genetic analyses of tumors

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and colleagues led by Catherine C. Coombs, MD, show that blood cell mutations accounted for as many as 8 percent of the mutations identified in large-scale genetic sequencing efforts at two major academic centers.

Blood mutations could contaminate genetic analyses of tumors - Read More…

T cells alone are sufficient to establish and maintain HIV infection in the brain

T cells alone are sufficient to establish and maintain HIV infection in the brain

Led by J. Victor Garcia, PhD, UNC researchers report in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that T cells in the brain may be an important HIV reservoir that should be targeted by HIV cure approaches.

T cells alone are sufficient to establish and maintain HIV infection in the brain - Read More…

Bae-Jump’s new research explores the origins of racial disparities in endometrial cancer

Bae-Jump’s new research explores the origins of racial disparities in endometrial cancer

Victoria Bae-Jump, MD, PhD, was recently awarded grant funding totaling more than $800,000 to further her research on the underlying biological factors that may influence the development and mortality of endometrial cancer in both Caucasian and African-American women.

Bae-Jump’s new research explores the origins of racial disparities in endometrial cancer - Read More…

Melanoma survivors share stories of recovery amid treatment advances

Melanoma survivors share stories of recovery amid treatment advances

The seminar “Understanding Melanoma: From Prevention to Treatment" was hosted by the UNC Lineberger and the Melanoma Research Foundation on May 14 for patients and caregivers at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education in Chapel Hill. Physicians, researchers, patients and staff spoke about advances in treatment and care for melanoma, research and prevention, as well as best practices to address the psychosocial aspects of care.

Melanoma survivors share stories of recovery amid treatment advances - Read More…

UNC Lineberger researchers show how viral protein helps drive cancer

UNC Lineberger researchers show how viral protein helps drive cancer

UNC Lineberger researchers led by Blossom Damania, PhD, and Penny Anders, PhD, published a paper in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that explains how the viral protein vPK helps drive abnormal growth of immune cells called B cells. Their findings identify vPK as a potential druggable target to block or treat cancer in people infected with the virus.

UNC Lineberger researchers show how viral protein helps drive cancer - Read More…

By forming clots in tumors, immune cells aid lung cancer's spread

By forming clots in tumors, immune cells aid lung cancer's spread

Researchers led by UNC Lineberger's Chad Pecot, MD, report in the journal Nature Communications that for a particular subset of lung cancer tumors, there is a high prevalence of immune cells called inflammatory monocytes. These cells, which normally help to build clotting scaffolds to promote wound healing, also make it possible for tumor cells to migrate and spread to other parts of the body.

By forming clots in tumors, immune cells aid lung cancer's spread - Read More…

Damania earns Faculty Award for Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring

Damania earns Faculty Award for Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring

Blossom Damania, PhD, vice dean for research at the UNC School of Medicine, was honored with the award at the UNC-Chapel Hill doctoral hooding ceremony May 12.

Damania earns Faculty Award for Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring - Read More…

For mothers with advanced cancer, parenting concerns affect emotional well-being

For mothers with advanced cancer, parenting concerns affect emotional well-being

A new study led by UNC Lineberger's Eliza M. Park, MD, shows that parenting concerns can have a significant impact on the mental and emotional health of women with advanced cancer. In particular, they found that a mother’s emotional well-being was significantly linked with whether she had communicated with her children about her illness, and her concerns about how her illness will financially impact her children.

For mothers with advanced cancer, parenting concerns affect emotional well-being - Read More…

UNC Lineberger’s Griffith elected into National Academy of Sciences

UNC Lineberger’s Griffith elected into National Academy of Sciences

A pioneer in high-resolution electron microscopy, Jack Griffith, PhD, earned one of the most prestigious honors in science during a career packed with distinguished research and collaborations that began prior to him coming to UNC-Chapel Hill in 1978.

UNC Lineberger’s Griffith elected into National Academy of Sciences - Read More…

Phenotyping may lead to more tailored treatment for head and neck cancer

Phenotyping may lead to more tailored treatment for head and neck cancer

Fourth-year medical student Wesley Stepp, PhD, has developed a testing method to predict aggressiveness of head and neck cancers and help physicians determine the ideal treatment regimen.

Phenotyping may lead to more tailored treatment for head and neck cancer - Read More…

UNC researchers identify promising delivery method for immunotherapy combination

UNC researchers identify promising delivery method for immunotherapy combination

UNC Lineberger researchers led by Andrew Z. Wang, associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology, believe findings, published in the journal Advanced Materials, offer a promising new nanotechnology-based delivery method for an immunotherapy combination.

UNC researchers identify promising delivery method for immunotherapy combination - Read More…

Cigarillo packaging can influence product perception, study finds

Cigarillo packaging can influence product perception, study finds

Researchers led by UNC Lineberger's Adam Goldstein, MD, and Clare Meernik, MPH, surveyed 2,664 young adults who were current users, never users, or past users of little cigars and cigarillos, finding cigarillo packs with colors and containing a flavor descriptor were rated more positively for taste and smell. Health warnings didn’t fully mitigate the draw of the packaging.

Cigarillo packaging can influence product perception, study finds - Read More…

UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer’s spread

UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer’s spread

In the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, UNC Lineberger’s Andrew Wang, MD, and colleagues report they have developed tissue-engineered models for cancer metastases that reflect the microenvironment around tumors that promotes their growth. They believe their models, which were developed to study colorectal cancer that had spread to the liver and lung, will help scientists studying why cancers tend to spread to certain organs rather than others.

UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer’s spread - Read More…

Pope Foundation donates $10 million to UNC-Chapel Hill

Pope Foundation donates $10 million to UNC-Chapel Hill

Carolina received a $10-million commitment from the John William Pope Foundation to provide support for the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, UNC Horizons, the track and field program, and the Philosophy, Politics and Economics Program.

Pope Foundation donates $10 million to UNC-Chapel Hill - Read More…

Strahl earns MIRA award from NIH

Strahl earns MIRA award from NIH

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences awarded Brian Strahl, PhD, $1.9 million over five years to continue investigating the detailed mechanisms of gene expression and chromatin, which are crucial to various diseases, especially cancers.

Strahl earns MIRA award from NIH - Read More…

Berg quoted in NY Times, WRAL Tech Wire on genetic screening

Berg quoted in NY Times, WRAL Tech Wire on genetic screening

As genetic testing increases in popularity, experts such as Jonathan Berg, MD, PhD, question the usefulness of screening disease risks for the general public until further research establishes best practices.

Berg quoted in NY Times, WRAL Tech Wire on genetic screening - Read More…

Cancer Transitions Wellness Program

Join UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Support Program for our Cancer Transitions Wellness Program. Cancer Transitions™ is a FREE workshop to help patients and their caregivers move forward with life after treatment ends.

Cancer Transitions Wellness Program - Read More…

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