Cancer

The latest cancer news from UNC Health Care and the UNC School of Medicine.

Delays for melanoma surgeries linked to insurance type

Delays for melanoma surgeries linked to insurance type

Researchers report in JAMA Dermatology that surgical treatment delays – defined as surgery that occurred more than six weeks after diagnosis – were common. Medicaid patients were 36 percent more likely than private insurance patients to experience delays.

Delays for melanoma surgeries linked to insurance type - Read More…

Blood test for HPV may help predict risk in cancer patients

Blood test for HPV may help predict risk in cancer patients

Preliminary findings from a study led by UNC Lineberger's Bhisham Chera, MD, and Gaorav Gupta, MD, PhD, suggest a genetic test for HPV16 in blood could be useful to help assess risk for patients and identify patients suitable for lower treatment doses.

Blood test for HPV may help predict risk in cancer patients - Read More…

Roy Williams' Fast Break Against Cancer tops $2.4 million

Roy Williams' Fast Break Against Cancer tops $2.4 million

On Oct. 2, North Carolina men's basketball coach Roy Williams hosted his 13th annual Fast Break Against Cancer breakfast and auction to support cancer research at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Roy Williams' Fast Break Against Cancer tops $2.4 million - Read More…

Can T cells be unleashed to attack skin tumors?

Can T cells be unleashed to attack skin tumors?

Maureen Su, MD, and colleagues report on a potential new way to fight melanoma by blocking one of the immune system’s checks and balances, thus freeing immune cells to attack tumors and kill cancer cells.

Can T cells be unleashed to attack skin tumors? - Read More…

How do cancer cells release their “brakes” to allow division?

How do cancer cells release their “brakes” to allow division?

Research led by Michael J. Emanuele, PhD, details a specific cellular pathway that allows replication and division – key information in the search for better ways to halt tumor growth.

How do cancer cells release their “brakes” to allow division? - Read More…

Savings less than expected for generic oral chemotherapy

Savings less than expected for generic oral chemotherapy

A study led by UNC Lineberger's Stacie Dusetzina, PhD, compared the cost of the generic and brand-name version of capecitabine, which was one of the first high-priced chemotherapy pills to come off patent in the United States. Their findings offer a glimpse into what could be happening with generic competition in this specialty drug market.

Savings less than expected for generic oral chemotherapy - Read More…

From the Ground Up: The State of Cancer Care in Malawi

From the Ground Up: The State of Cancer Care in Malawi

Satish Gopal, MD, head of UNC’s cancer care efforts at UNC-Project Malawi, will welcome collaborators from across the region for the Malawi Cancer Care Symposium on Aug. 28 and 29.

From the Ground Up: The State of Cancer Care in Malawi - Read More…

Researchers find genetic precursors of leukemia in patients treated for non-blood cancers

Researchers find genetic precursors of leukemia in patients treated for non-blood cancers

A study led by UNC Lineberger's Catherine Coombs, MD, revealed new risk factors for “clonal hematopoiesis,” a medical phenomenon in which genetic mutations are found in the blood cells of patients who do not have an existing blood cancer.

Researchers find genetic precursors of leukemia in patients treated for non-blood cancers - Read More…

Researchers look to improve detection of skin cancer lacking pigment melanin

Researchers look to improve detection of skin cancer lacking pigment melanin

UNC Lineberger researchers led by Nancy Thomas, MD, PhD, have identified key features linked to amelanotic melanoma, a form of skin cancer that lacks the brown or black color that stems from the pigment melanin.

Researchers look to improve detection of skin cancer lacking pigment melanin - Read More…

Aggressive breast cancers may contribute to racial survival disparities

Aggressive breast cancers may contribute to racial survival disparities

In the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, UNC Lineberger researchers led by Melissa Troester, PhD, published results of an analysis of approximately 1,000 invasive breast tumors. The study confirmed that young black women are more likely to have “triple negative,” or “basal-like,” breast cancers, a subtype that does not express any of the receptors for targeted biologic therapies. The study also identified variation by race within a clinical breast cancer type that has the greatest mortality disparity.

Aggressive breast cancers may contribute to racial survival disparities - Read More…

 Clinical trials framework proposed to bring cancer treatments to sub-Saharan Africa

Clinical trials framework proposed to bring cancer treatments to sub-Saharan Africa

In the journal PLOS Medicine, Satish Gopal, MD, MPH, cancer program director for UNC-Project Malawi, outlined a framework to design studies and bring cancer therapies to sub-Saharan Africa in the absence of clinical trial data specific to the region’s population and health care infrastructure.

Clinical trials framework proposed to bring cancer treatments to sub-Saharan Africa - Read More…

 Using ‘sticky’ nanoparticles, researchers develop new strategy to boost body’s cancer defenses

Using ‘sticky’ nanoparticles, researchers develop new strategy to boost body’s cancer defenses

In the journal Nature Nanotechnology, UNC Lineberger researchers led by Andrew Wang, MD, report on strides made in the development of a strategy to improve the immune system's detection of cancer proteins by using “sticky” nanoparticles.

Using ‘sticky’ nanoparticles, researchers develop new strategy to boost body’s cancer defenses - Read More…

Researchers strive to improve cancer care for older patients

Researchers strive to improve cancer care for older patients

At the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, UNC Lineberger researchers led by Hyman B. Muss, MD, presented preliminary findings from several studies focused on older adults with cancer.

Researchers strive to improve cancer care for older patients - Read More…

UNC Lineberger research featured at ASCO Annual Meeting

UNC Lineberger research featured at ASCO Annual Meeting

Research presented by UNC Lineberger members was featured in plenary and other major sessions of the meeting this year, and was picked up by multiple media outlets.

UNC Lineberger research featured at ASCO Annual Meeting - Read More…

Where Cigarette Smoking’s Damage is Done . . . Down to Your DNA

Where Cigarette Smoking’s Damage is Done . . . Down to Your DNA

A new technique from UNC School of Medicine scientists led by Nobel Prize winner Aziz Sancar reveals the genome-wide DNA damage that a major carcinogen causes.

Where Cigarette Smoking’s Damage is Done . . . Down to Your DNA - Read More…

Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organization

Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organization

UNC study uncovers crucial function of a yeast enzyme Set2 whose well-conserved human counterpart is often mutated in cancers, especially kidney cancer.

Researchers show how a cancer gene protects genome organization - Read More…

Promising results found for treatment of melanoma in the brain

Promising results found for treatment of melanoma in the brain

At the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2017 in Chicago, researchers presented promising data for two different investigational drug regimens used to treat melanoma that has spread to the brain, a common and deadly complication of this cancer.

Promising results found for treatment of melanoma in the brain - Read More…

New models of kidney cancer may drive immunotherapy research

New models of kidney cancer may drive immunotherapy research

UNC Lineberger member William Y. Kim, MD, and his colleagues report in the journal Nature Communications they have created mouse models of both papillary and clear cell renal cell carcinoma that faithfully mimic the genetic changes seen in tumors of patients with these cancers.

New models of kidney cancer may drive immunotherapy research - Read More…

UNC REX Healthcare presents run/walk to end prostate cancer

UNC REX Healthcare presents run/walk to end prostate cancer

The inaugural Zero – The End of Prostate Cancer run/walk in Raleigh takes place at 7:45 a.m. Saturday, June 24.

UNC REX Healthcare presents run/walk to end prostate cancer - Read More…

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